Book cover. Click to enlarge.

A Study in Scarlet
by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

Poe often found inspiration for his own stories and poems while reading the works of other writers. His failure to acknowledge these sources of inspiration sometimes led to charges of plagiarism. One he did acknowledge, Elizabeth Barrett Browning's poem "Lady Geraldine's Courtship," inspired the rhyme and meter of his poem "The Raven."

Poe, too, had an influence on the generations of writers who followed him. C. Auguste Dupin, the crime-solving character who appeared in "Murders in the Rue Morgue" and "The Purloined Letter," served as the inspiration for Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's famous detective Sherlock Holmes. Stephen King has called Poe's "The Tell-Tale Heart" the "first work of criminal sociopathy" and credits Poe as being the literary father of many of the best crime writers of the twentieth century.


Activity

If you would like to read more about Poe or read stories or poems similar to or inspired by Poe, try the following.

If you enjoyed the crime-solving skills of Dupin in "Murders in the Rue Morgue," "The Mystery of Marie Roget," and "The Purloined Letter," you might like:

If you liked the decoding and treasure hunting in "The Gold-Bug," you might like:

If you liked the dark imagery and horror in Poe's "The Fall of the House of Usher," "The Pit and the Pendulum," and "Ligeia," you might like:

If you would like to read contemporary essays and short stories inspired by Poe, you might like:

If you are interested in Poe's life and would like read fictional accounts of Poe, you might like:

If you are interested in Poe's life and legacy and would like to read non-fiction accounts of Poe, you might like: