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FALL 2009

Curators' Tour of From Out That Shadow: The Life and Legacy of Edgar Allan Poe TOUR THURSDAY, DECEMBER 10, 7 P.M.

Exhibition co-curators Richard Oram and Molly Schwartzburg lead a gallery tour of From Out That Shadow: The Life and Legacy of Edgar Allan Poe on Thursday, December 10, at 7 p.m.

Experience the enduring influence of Edgar Allan Poe in this exhibition about the great American poet, critic, and inventor of the detective story. Commemorating the bicentennial of Poe's birth, this exhibition draws upon the holdings of the Harry Ransom Center and the University of Virginia to explore Poe's works, his relationships and mysterious death, and his literary reputation.

If you can't attend the curators' tour, free docent-led tours of the current Poe and Other Worlds: Rare Astronomical Works exhibitions are offered Tuesdays at noon and Saturdays at 2 p.m.

The exhibitions are on display through January 3, 2010.


Stardust OTHER WORLDS FILM SERIES MONDAY, DECEMBER 7, 7 P.M.

The Other Worlds Film Series concludes at the Harry Ransom Center with Stardust (2007) on Monday, December 7, at 7 p.m.

Stardust tells the story of Tristan, who ventures into a magical kingdom to retrieve a fallen star for his beloved, only to find he's one of many who seek the star. Directed by Matthew Vaughn, the film stars Claire Danes, Michelle Pfeiffer, Ricky Gervais, Rupert Everett, and Robert De Niro, whose archive is housed at the Ransom Center.

Seating is free, but limited.

This screening complements the Ransom Center's exhibition Other Worlds: Rare Astronomical Works. Discover "other worlds" and the changing notions of the solar system, the moon, and the planets over the centuries. In conjunction with the International Year of Astronomy in 2009, this exhibition, drawn from the Center's collections, showcases important astronomical discoveries of the last 500 years. The exhibition is on display through January 3, 2010.

VIEW TRAILER for this film on the Ransom Center's YouTube channel


"Making Sense of Hard Times: How the Arts Helped Americans through the Great Depression" LECTURE THURSDAY, DECEMBER 3, 7 P.M.

For the 2009 Stanley Burnshaw Lecture, author Morris Dickstein presents "Making Sense of Hard Times: How the Arts Helped Americans through the Great Depression" on Thursday, December 3, at 7 p.m. at the Harry Ransom Center. A book signing follows.

What is the role of the arts in hard times, such as the Great Depression or the current recession? How do they help people deal with both social problems and their own private fears? Using examples from literature, film, music, and photography, Dickstein explores how artists and popular entertainers of the 1930s helped the nation understand and survive an unprecedented social crisis.

Dickstein is a Distinguished Professor of English at Queens College and at the Graduate Center, where he is also a senior fellow of the Center for the Humanities. His books include Gates of Eden: American Culture in the Sixties (1977, 1997), a nominee for the National Book Critics Circle Award in criticism; Double Agent: The Critic and Society (1992); and Leopards in the Temple: The Transformation of American Fiction, 1945-1970 (2002). Dickstein is a contributing editor of Partisan Review and has published many essays and reviews in The New York Times Book Review, The New Republic, The Nation, the Times Literary Supplement, The American Scholar, and other major periodicals.


Poetry on the Plaza: Singers and Songwriters READING WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 2, NOON

Poetry on the Plaza: Singers and Songwriters

The Harry Ransom Center presents the Poetry on the Plaza event Singers and Songwriters on Wednesday, December 2, at noon.

Musicians Bruce Robison, Christine Albert, Chris Gage, and Brian Cassidy perform and read poetry.

View photos from this event

As a songwriter, Bruce Robison's songs have been covered by a variety of artists, including Garth Brooks, The Dixie Chicks ("Travelin' Soldier"), Tim McGraw ("Angry All The Time"), Lee Ann Womack, George Strait ("Wrapped"), Gary Allan, wife Kelly Willis, and brother Charlie Robison. He recently released his latest single, "Born to Roll," and his full-length album, From The Top, will be released in 2010.

Originally from upstate New York and later Santa Fe, New Mexico, Christine Albert moved to Austin, Texas in 1982. She has released five independent albums including TEXAFRANCE, TexaFrance-Encore!, and Paris, Texafrance, bilingual tributes to her European heritage and love of the French chanson. Since 1997, Albert has also become known as one half of the Texas duo Albert and Gage, with her husband Chris Gage. Together they have released five CDs and have performed throughout the United States and Europe. Albert has appeared on Austin City Limits, written and performed her own "Don't Mess With Texas" ad, and was featured in a popular Bluebell Ice Cream television commercial. In 1996 she was voted Female Vocalist of the Year at the Kerrville Music Awards.

Originally from South Dakota, Chris Gage was the founding member of the 1970s Midwest country swing band, Red Willow Band. After releasing two albums with RWB, he embarked on a lengthy stint as a sideman, moving to Tulsa, Oklahoma, to play piano with Roy Clark for eight years, appearing on The Tonight Show (Johnny Carson) and Hee Haw, as well as accompanying Clark on a 1988 tour of the Soviet Union. He moved to Austin in the early 1990s, and became band leader for Jimmie Dale Gilmore (playing guitar and piano) for three years, with performances on The Tonight Show (Jay Leno), Late Show with Conan O'Brien, and at such esteemed venues as Carnegie Hall and The Royal Albert Hall. An in-demand studio musician and producer, Gage produces Albert and Gage as well as other artists and has numerous other production and studio credits.

Brian Cassidy is a guitarist and multi-instrumentalist for Okkervil River and a 2004 graduate of The University of Texas at Austin Butler School of Music. Brian has been featured with Okkervil River in The New York Times and Rolling Stone; on air with NPR, the BBC, and RadioFrance; and on television with MTV, NBC, the Australian Broadcasting Company, and a recent performance on PBS's Austin City Limits. Brian is happy to be taking an extended break from touring to spend time with his wife and their 18-month-old daughter.

Refreshments will be served at this free event.


Forbidden Planet OTHER WORLDS FILM SERIES MONDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 7 P.M.

The Other Worlds Film Series continues at the Harry Ransom Center with Forbidden Planet (1956) on Monday, November 23, at 7 p.m.

Starring Leslie Nielsen and Walter Pidgeon and directed by Fred M. Wilcox, this science-fiction classic tells the story of a crew sent to investigate the sudden silence of a scientist colony on another planet, only to find two survivors and a dangerous secret.

Seating is free, but limited.

This screening complements the Ransom Center's exhibition Other Worlds: Rare Astronomical Works. Discover "other worlds" and the changing notions of the solar system, the moon, and the planets over the centuries. In conjunction with the International Year of Astronomy in 2009, this exhibition, drawn from the Center's collections, showcases important astronomical discoveries of the last 500 years. The exhibition is on display through January 3, 2010.

Mark your calendar for the final screening in the series: Stardust (2007) on December 7.

VIEW TRAILER for this film on the Ransom Center's YouTube channel


James Fenton HARRY RANSOM LECTURE THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 7 P.M.

The University Co-op presents a Harry Ransom Lectures event with poet and critic James Fenton, as he discusses "Life-Writing," new approaches to autobiography, biography, and memoir on Thursday, November 12, at 7 p.m. A book signing follows.

Fenton was born in Lincoln, England, in 1949 and educated at Magdalen College, Oxford where he won the Newdigate Prize for poetry. He has worked as a political journalist, drama critic, book reviewer, war correspondent, foreign correspondent, and columnist. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature and was Oxford Professor of Poetry from 1994 to 1999. In 2007, Fenton was awarded the Queen's Gold Medal for Poetry. Fenton's Selected Poems was published in 2006. He is the editor of The New Faber Book of Love Poems (2008) and D. H. Lawrence's Selected Poems (2009).

Seating is free, but limited.

The Harry Ransom Lectures honor former University of Texas Chancellor Harry Huntt Ransom and highlight the Ransom Center's vital role in the University's intellectual and cultural life. The program brings internationally renowned writers, artists, and scholars to Austin for public events and conversations with University students. The lectures are made possible by the generous support of the University Co-op.

Mark your calendars for the other Harry Ransom Lectures event in 2010: Sarah Greenough on February 25.

LEARN MORE about the Harry Ransom Lectures

Presented by the University Co-op


A Trip to the Moon (Le Voyage dans la Lune) OTHER WORLDS FILM SERIES MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 7 P.M.

The Harry Ransom Center kicks off the Other Worlds Film Series with a collection of early silent films, including Georges Méliès's 1902 short A Trip to the Moon (Le Voyage dans la Lune), on Monday, November 9, at 7 p.m.

In this classic silent film, a group of men travel to the moon in a capsule shot from a giant cannon.

Seating is free, but limited.

This screening complements the Ransom Center's exhibition Other Worlds: Rare Astronomical Works. Discover "other worlds" and the changing notions of the solar system, the moon, and the planets over the centuries. In conjunction with the International Year of Astronomy in 2009, this exhibition, drawn from the Center's collections, showcases important astronomical discoveries of the last 500 years. The exhibition is on display through January 3, 2010.

Mark your calendar for other screenings in the series: Forbidden Planet (1956) on November 23 and Stardust (2007) on December 7.

VIEW TRAILER for this film on the Ransom Center's YouTube channel


Curator's Tour of Other Worlds: Rare Astronomical Works TOUR THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 5, NOON

The Ransom Center's Associate Director and Hobby Foundation Librarian, Richard Oram, leads a free lunch-time gallery tour of Other Worlds: Rare Astronomical Works on Thursday, November 5, at noon.

Discover "other worlds" and the changing notions of the solar system, the moon, and the planets over the centuries. In conjunction with the International Year of Astronomy in 2009, this exhibition, drawn from the Center's collections, showcases important astronomical discoveries of the last 500 years.

If you can't attend the curator's tour, free docent-led tours of Other Worlds and From Out That Shadow: The Life and Legacy of Edgar Allan Poe are offered Tuesdays at noon and Saturdays at 2 p.m.

The exhibition is on display through January 3, 2010.

Visit the exhibition page to view a video preview, an interview with the curator, and an interactive spinning globe featured in the exhibition.


Poetry on the Plaza: The Moon and the Stars READING WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 4, NOON

Poetry on the Plaza: The Moon and the Stars


Texas Book Festival BOOTH SATURDAY, OCTOBER 31 – SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 1 STATE CAPITOL

Visit the Ransom Center's booth at the Texas Book Festival for reading guides, bookmarks, and a limited number of free copies of The Stories and Poems of Edgar Allan Poe, the selection for the Ransom Center's Big Read.

VIEW all Big Read programs


Texas Book Festival DISCUSSION SATURDAY, OCTOBER 31, 1 P.M. STATE CAPITOL

The Harry Ransom Center and the Texas Book Festival present a panel on the post-racial American fiction landscape with Colson Whitehead on Saturday, October 31, at 1 p.m. in the Senate Chamber at the State Capitol. The panel will be moderated by Walton Muyumba, writer, critic, and associate professor of American and African-American literature at the University of North Texas.

Colson Whitehead's first novel, The Intuitionist, was a finalist for the Hemingway Foundation/PEN Award and a winner of the Quality Paperback Book Club's New Voices Award. His follow-up novel, John Henry Days, was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award, the Los Angeles Times Fiction Award, and the Pulitzer Prize. The novel received the Young Lions Fiction Award and the Anisfield-Wolf Book Award. His most recent novel, Sag Harbor, published in 2009, is a novel about teenagers hanging out in Sag Harbor, Long Island, during the summer of 1985. Whitehead's reviews, essays, and fiction have appeared in a number of publications, such as the New York Times, The New Yorker, New York Magazine, Harper's, and Granta. He has received a MacArthur Fellowship, a Whiting Writers Award, and a fellowship at the Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers.

Visit the Ransom Center's booth at the Texas Book Festival on October 31 and November 1 for reading guides, bookmarks, and a limited number of free copies of The Stories and Poems of Edgar Allan Poe, the selection for the Ransom Center's NEA-sponsored Big Read program.

VIEW all Big Read programs


Music from the Collections: "Can You Tell a Joke with Music?" PERFORMANCE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 29, 7 P.M. JESSEN AUDITORIUM

In a Music from the Collections event, University of Texas at Austin Professor Robert Freeman presents "Can You Tell a Joke with Music?" featuring works by Emmanuel Chabrier, Claude Debussy, Joseph Haydn, and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart on Thursday, October 29, at 7 p.m. at Jessen Auditorium.

Freeman explores the connection between words and music, examining not only the relationship between a text and the music that sets it, but the potential use of words as a way of bringing the audience to the music. Freeman looks closely at Chabrier's "Souvenirs de Munich," Debussy's "Golliwog's Cakewalk," Haydn's "The Joke Quartet," and Mozart's "A Musical Joke."

Freeman will be joined by Michael Schneider, a distinguished pianist from San Angelo and a Doctor of Musical Arts candidate in the University's Butler School of Music, for the performance of the Chabrier piece.

Seating is free, but limited.

LEARN MORE about the Ransom Center's music collections


Spirits of the Dead (Histoires Extraordinaires) POE FILM SERIES MONDAY, OCTOBER 26, 7 P.M.

The Poe Film Series concludes at the Harry Ransom Center as Federico Fellini, Louis Malle, and Roger Vadim bring three adaptations of Poe stories to the screen in the 1968 film Spirits of the Dead (Histoires extraordinaires) on Monday, October 26, at 7 p.m.

Fellini adapts "Toby Dammit," starring Terrence Stamp as the drunken title character who travels to Rome to film a Catholic Western. Malle helms "William Wilson," starring Alain Delon as a sadistic Austrian student and Bridget Bardot as one of his victims. Vadim takes on "Metzengerstein," starring Jane Fonda as a Medieval countess and Peter Fonda as her dead lover.

Seating is free, but limited.

The screening is held in conjunction with the Ransom Center's exhibition From Out That Shadow: The Life and Legacy of Edgar Allan Poe. Experience the enduring influence of Edgar Allan Poe in this exhibition about the great American poet, critic, and inventor of the detective story. Commemorating the bicentennial of Poe's birth, this exhibition draws upon the holdings of the Ransom Center and the University of Virginia to explore Poe's works, his relationships and mysterious death, and his literary reputation.

This event is made possible by The Big Read, an initiative of the National Endowment for the Arts in partnership with the Institute of Museum and Library Services and Arts Midwest.

VIEW all Big Read programs

VIEW TRAILER for this film on the Ransom Center's YouTube channel


Curator's Tour of From Out That Shadow: The Life and Legacy of Edgar Allan Poe TOUR THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22, 7 P.M.

Molly Schwartzburg, the Ransom Center's Curator of British and American Literature and Co-Curator of the exhibition, leads a gallery tour of From Out That Shadow: The Life and Legacy of Edgar Allan Poe on Thursday, October 22, at 7 p.m.

Experience the enduring influence of Edgar Allan Poe in this exhibition about the great American poet, critic, and inventor of the detective story. Commemorating the bicentennial of Poe's birth, this exhibition draws upon the holdings of the Harry Ransom Center and the University of Virginia to explore Poe's works, his relationships and mysterious death, and his literary reputation.

If you can't attend the curator's tour, free docent-led tours of the current Poe and Other Worlds: Rare Astronomical Works exhibitions are offered Tuesdays at noon and Saturdays at 2 p.m.

The exhibitions are on display through January 3, 2010.

This event is made possible by The Big Read, an initiative of the National Endowment for the Arts in partnership with the Institute of Museum and Library Services and Arts Midwest.

VIEW all Big Read programs


The Raven POE FILM SERIES MONDAY, OCTOBER 19, 7 P.M.

The Poe Film Series continues at the Harry Ransom Center with Roger Corman's The Raven (1963), starring Vincent Price, Peter Lorre, and Boris Karloff, on Monday, October 19, at 7 p.m.

Based loosely on Poe's poem of the same name, The Raven tells the story of a magician who has been turned into a raven and must seek help from a former sorcerer.

Seating is free, but limited.

The screening is held in conjunction with the Ransom Center's exhibition From Out That Shadow: The Life and Legacy of Edgar Allan Poe. Experience the enduring influence of Edgar Allan Poe in this exhibition about the great American poet, critic, and inventor of the detective story. Commemorating the bicentennial of Poe's birth, this exhibition draws upon the holdings of the Ransom Center and the University of Virginia to explore Poe's works, his relationships and mysterious death, and his literary reputation.

Mark your calendars for the final screening in the Poe Film Series: Spirits of the Dead (Histoires extraordinaires) (1968) on October 26.

This event is made possible by The Big Read, an initiative of the National Endowment for the Arts in partnership with the Institute of Museum and Library Services and Arts Midwest.

VIEW all Big Read programs

VIEW TRAILER for this film on the Ransom Center's YouTube channel


Performance of "The Tell-Tale Heart" PERFORMANCE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15, 7 P.M.

Lucien Douglas, Professor of Theatre and Dance at The University of Texas at Austin, performs "The Tell-Tale Heart" and other selections from Edgar Allan Poe on Thursday, October 15, at 7 p.m. at the Harry Ransom Center.

Douglas brings Poe's biography and work to life. In a performance incorporating Poe's letters, incidents from his life, and his poetry and short stories, Douglas explores the depths of Poe's suffering and his longing for perfect love.

Seating is free, but limited.

WATCH THIS EVENT

This program is held in conjunction with the Ransom Center's exhibition From Out That Shadow: The Life and Legacy of Edgar Allan Poe. Experience the enduring influence of Edgar Allan Poe in this exhibition about the great American poet, critic, and inventor of the detective story. Commemorating the bicentennial of Poe's birth, this exhibition draws upon the holdings of the Ransom Center and the University of Virginia to explore Poe's works, his relationships and mysterious death, and his literary reputation.

This event is made possible by The Big Read, an initiative of the National Endowment for the Arts in partnership with the Institute of Museum and Library Services and Arts Midwest.

VIEW all Big Read programs


The Pit and the Pendulum POE FILM SERIES MONDAY, OCTOBER 12, 7 P.M.

The Poe Film Series continues at the Harry Ransom Center with Roger Corman's The Pit and the Pendulum (1961), starring Vincent Price, on Monday, October 12, at 7 p.m.

Based on Poe's classic short story, The Pit and the Pendulum tells the tale of Francis Barnard, who travels to Spain to investigate his sister's sudden death and is unconvinced by the explanation given by her husband, the son of a notorious Spanish Inquisition torturer.

Seating is free, but limited.

The screening is held in conjunction with the Ransom Center's exhibition From Out That Shadow: The Life and Legacy of Edgar Allan Poe. Experience the enduring influence of Edgar Allan Poe in this exhibition about the great American poet, critic, and inventor of the detective story. Commemorating the bicentennial of Poe's birth, this exhibition draws upon the holdings of the Ransom Center and the University of Virginia to explore Poe's works, his relationships and mysterious death, and his literary reputation.

Mark your calendars for other screenings in the Poe Film Series: The Raven (1963) on October 19 and Spirits of the Dead (Histoires extraordinaires) (1968) on October 26.

This event is made possible by The Big Read, an initiative of the National Endowment for the Arts in partnership with the Institute of Museum and Library Services and Arts Midwest.

VIEW all Big Read programs

VIEW TRAILER for this film on the Ransom Center's YouTube channel


Alan Furst HARRY RANSOM LECTURE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8, 7 P.M.

The University Co-op presents a Harry Ransom Lectures event with writer Alan Furst, whose archive is housed at the Ransom Center. Furst reads from his work and answers audience questions on Thursday, October 8, at 7 p.m. at the Harry Ransom Center. A book signing follows.

Heir to the tradition of Graham Greene and Eric Ambler, writer Alan Furst has received critical and popular acclaim for his novels of historical espionage. Furst was born and raised in Manhattan. He lived in the South of France as a Fulbright Teaching Fellow at the Faculte des Lettres at the University of Montpellier, then in Seattle, where he worked for the City of Seattle Arts Commission. He wrote for magazines, including travel pieces and book reviews for Esquire, and wrote and published four novels. Returning to France, Furst lived in Paris, wrote a weekly column for The International Herald Tribune, and wrote his first historical espionage novel, Night Soldiers (1988). This was followed by Dark Star (1991), The Polish Officer (1995), The World at Night (1996), Red Gold (1999), Kingdom of Shadows (2000), Blood of Victory (2002), Dark Voyage (2004), The Foreign Correspondent (2006), and The Spies of Warsaw (2008).

Seating is free, but limited.

The Harry Ransom Lectures honor former University of Texas Chancellor Harry Huntt Ransom and highlight the Ransom Center's vital role in the University's intellectual and cultural life. The program brings internationally renowned writers, artists, and scholars to Austin for public events and conversations with University students. The lectures are made possible by the generous support of the University Co-op.

Mark your calendars for other Harry Ransom Lectures: James Fenton on November 12 and Sarah Greenough on February 25.

LEARN MORE about the Harry Ransom Lectures

Presented by the University Co-op


Poetry on the Plaza: Edgar Allan Poe READING WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 7, NOON

Poetry on the Plaza: Edgar Allan Poe


The Fall of the House of Usher POE FILM SERIES MONDAY, OCTOBER 5, 7 P.M.

The Poe Film Series continues at the Harry Ransom Center with The Fall of the House of Usher (1960), directed by Roger Corman and starring Vincent Price, on Monday, October 5, at 7 p.m.

Based on Poe's classic short story, the film chronicles the story of Philip, who visits the Usher mansion and finds his friend Roderick mysteriously ill and sister Madeline in a catatonic state. As Philip learns more about the curse in the Usher family, he's horrified to see the effects of the curse continue to escalate and take their toll.

Seating is free, but limited.

The screening is held in conjunction with the Ransom Center's exhibition From Out That Shadow: The Life and Legacy of Edgar Allan Poe. Experience the enduring influence of Edgar Allan Poe in this exhibition about the great American poet, critic, and inventor of the detective story. Commemorating the bicentennial of Poe's birth, this exhibition draws upon the holdings of the Ransom Center and the University of Virginia to explore Poe's works, his relationships and mysterious death, and his literary reputation.

Mark your calendars for other screenings in the Poe Film Series: The Pit and the Pendulum (1961) on October 12, The Raven (1963) on October 19, and Spirits of the Dead (Histoires extraordinaires) (1968) on October 26.

This event is made possible by The Big Read, an initiative of the National Endowment for the Arts in partnership with the Institute of Museum and Library Services and Arts Midwest.

VIEW all Big Read programs

VIEW TRAILER for this film on the Ransom Center's YouTube channel


Poetry on the Plaza: The Sand and the Oyster: The Poetry of Carol Ann Duffy READING WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, NOON

The Ransom Center presents the free Poetry on the Plaza event The Sand and the Oyster: The Poetry of Carol Ann Duffy on Wednesday, September 30, at noon.

Caroline Devlin, of Actors from the London Stage, will read works by British Poet Laureate Carol Ann Duffy.

Devlin graduated from The Drama Centre London in 1995 and has performed at such theatres as The Royal Lyceum in Edinburgh, where she was a regular member of the company and played many parts, including Masha in Anton Chekhov's Three Sisters, Hero in Much Ado About Nothing, Lady Macduff in Macbeth, Arte O'Neill in Dion Boucicault's The Shaughraun, and Wendy in J. M. Barrie's Peter Pan.

Refreshments will be served at this free event.

Pick up a free poster and bookmark with the 2009–10 Poetry on the Plaza schedule at the visitors desk in the Ransom Center lobby.


The Fall of the House of Usher and La Chute de la Maison Usher POE FILM SERIES MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 7 P.M.

The Harry Ransom Center kicks off the Poe Film Series with two silent classics, The Fall of the House of Usher (1928), directed by James Sibley Watson and Melville Webber, and a French adaptation, La Chute de la maison Usher (1928), directed by Jean Epstein. The free screenings take place on Monday, September 28, at 7 p.m. at the Harry Ransom Center.

Based on Poe's classic short story, both films chronicle the horrors a traveler faces when he encounters the strange happenings inside the Usher mansion.

Seating is free, but limited.

The screening is held in conjunction with the Ransom Center's exhibition From Out That Shadow: The Life and Legacy of Edgar Allan Poe. Experience the enduring influence of Edgar Allan Poe in this exhibition about the great American poet, critic, and inventor of the detective story. Commemorating the bicentennial of Poe's birth, this exhibition draws upon the holdings of the Ransom Center and the University of Virginia to explore Poe's works, his relationships and mysterious death, and his literary reputation.

Mark your calendars for other screenings in the Poe Film Series: The Fall of the House of Usher (1960) on October 5, The Pit and the Pendulum (1961) on October 12, The Raven (1963) on October 19, and Spirits of the Dead (Histoires extraordinaires) (1968) on October 26.

VIEW all Big Read programs

VIEW TRAILER for this film on the Ransom Center's YouTube channel


"The Uses of Astronomy" LECTURE FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 7 P.M.

Steven Weinberg, Nobel Prize-winner and Professor in the Department of Physics at The University of Texas at Austin, discusses "The Uses of Astronomy" on Friday, September 25, at 7 p.m. at the Harry Ransom Center.

Seating is free, but limited.

This program complements the Ransom Center's exhibition Other Worlds: Rare Astronomical Works. Discover "other worlds" and the changing notions of the solar system, the moon, and the planets over the centuries. In conjunction with the International Year of Astronomy in 2009, this exhibition, drawn from the Center's collections, showcases important astronomical discoveries of the last 500 years. The exhibition is on display through January 3, 2010.


"Edgar Allan Poe: Poet and Storyteller" PERFORMANCE THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 7 P.M. JESSEN AUDITORIUM

Isaiah Sheffer of Selected Shorts, heard on public radio stations across America, hosts "Edgar Allan Poe: Poet and Storyteller," on Thursday, September 24, at 7 p.m. at Jessen Auditorium.

The program, held in conjunction with the Ransom Center's exhibition From Out That Shadow: The Life and Legacy of Edgar Allan Poe, features actors René Auberjonois and Fionnula Flanagan. They will read works by Poe, including "The Raven," "Annabel Lee," "The Black Cat," "Alone," "To Helen," "The Masque of the Red Death," "The Sphinx," and "The Bells."

Sheffer is co-founder and artistic director of Symphony Space and director and host of Selected Shorts. Tony Award-winning actor Auberjonois has acted in a variety of theater productions, films, and television programs, including Benson, Star Trek: Deep Space Nine, The Practice, Judging Amy, and Frasier. Flanagan starred as Gerty McDowell in the 1967 film version of Ulysses and has since appeared in numerous James Joyce-related projects and in Chicago Hope, Poltergeist: The Legacy, The Others (2001), and Waking Ned Devine (1998).

Seating is free, but limited. Doors open at 6:30 p.m.

WATCH THIS EVENT

Experience the enduring influence of Edgar Allan Poe in the exhibition From Out That Shadow about the great American poet, critic, and inventor of the detective story. Commemorating the bicentennial of Poe's birth, this exhibition draws upon the holdings of the Ransom Center and the University of Virginia to explore Poe's works, his relationships and mysterious death, and his literary reputation. The exhibition is on display through January 3, 2010.

This event is made possible by The Big Read, an initiative of the National Endowment for the Arts in partnership with the Institute of Museum and Library Services and Arts Midwest.

VIEW all Big Read programs

Actors subject to change.


Curator's Tour of From Out That Shadow: The Life and Legacy of Edgar Allan Poe TOUR THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 7 P.M.

Harry Ransom Center Associate Director and Hobby Foundation Librarian Richard Oram leads a free gallery tour of From Out That Shadow: The Life and Legacy of Edgar Allan Poe on Thursday, September 17, at 7 p.m.

Experience the enduring influence of Edgar Allan Poe in this exhibition about the great American poet, critic, and inventor of the detective story. Commemorating the bicentennial of Poe's birth, this exhibition draws upon the holdings of the Harry Ransom Center and the University of Virginia to explore Poe's works, his relationships and mysterious death, and his literary reputation.

A second curator's tour of From Out That Shadow takes place Thursday, October 22, at 7 p.m.

If you can't attend the curator's tour, free docent-led tours of the current Poe and Other Worlds: Rare Astronomical Works exhibition are offered Tuesdays at noon and Saturdays at 2 p.m.

The exhibitions are on display through January 3, 2010.

This event is made possible by The Big Read, an initiative of the National Endowment for the Arts in partnership with the Institute of Museum and Library Services and Arts Midwest.

VIEW all Big Read programs


Poetry on the Plaza: Farewell to Summer READING WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, NOON

The Harry Ransom Center kicks off the 2009–10 Poetry on the Plaza season with Farewell to Summer on Wednesday, September 2, at noon.

Despite Austin's record-hot temperatures, the summer season is officially drawing to a close. Come say farewell with readers Professor Elizabeth Cullingford of the Department of English; Professor Michael Starbird of the Department of Mathematics; and Lawrence Wright, author, screenwriter, playwright, and staff writer for The New Yorker magazine.

Refreshments will be served at this free event.

Pick up a free poster and bookmark with the 2009–10 Poetry on the Plaza schedule at the visitors desk in the Ransom Center lobby.


Spring 2009

Orientalist Silents Film Series: The Adventures of Prince Achmed FILM SERIES THURSDAY, JULY 23, 7 P.M.

The Orientalist Silents Film Series concludes as the Harry Ransom Center screens Lotte Reiniger's film The Adventures of Prince Achmed (1926), one of the earliest animated features ever produced, on Thursday, July 23, at 7 p.m.

Based on stories from The Arabian Nights, The Adventures of Prince Achmed tells the story of a wicked sorcerer who tricks Prince Achmed into riding a magical flying horse. The heroic prince subdues the magical horse, which he uses to fly off on many adventures. While traveling, he falls in love with the beautiful Princess Peri Banu and must defeat an army of demons to win her heart. The entire film is animated using the silhouette technique, which employs movable cardboard and metal cutouts posed in front of illuminated sheets of glass.

Seating is free, but limited.

The two silent films made about the life of Omar Khayyám are lost; in their place, these screenings offer a glimpse of Western attitudes toward an imagined Orient at the height of the Rubáiyát's fame.

This program is in conjunction with The Persian Sensation: The Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyám in the West, which is on display through August 2. The year 2009 marks the 150th anniversary of Edward FitzGerald's landmark translation of the poetry of the medieval Persian astronomer Omar Khayyám. These gemlike verses about mortality, fate, and doubt became an unprecedented popular phenomenon in England and America but have since fallen into obscurity. Featuring 200 items from the Ransom Center's extensive collections, the exhibition narrates The Rubáiyát's history through such items as Persian manuscripts, miniature editions, and illustrated parodies.


Orientalist Silents Film Series: The Thief of Bagdad FILM SERIES THURSDAY, JUNE 25, 7 P.M.

The Orientalist Silents Film Series continues as the Harry Ransom Center screens Raoul Walsh's film The Thief of Bagdad (1924), starring Douglas Fairbanks, on Thursday, June 25, at 7 p.m.

A thief falls in love with the Caliph of Bagdad's daughter. The Caliph will give her hand to the suitor who brings back the rarest treasure after seven moons, prompting the thief to set off on a magical journey while, unbeknownst to him, another suitor, the Prince of the Mongols, is not playing by the rules.

Seating is free, but limited.

The two silent films made about the life of Omar Khayyám are lost; in their place, these screenings offer a glimpse of Western attitudes toward an imagined Orient at the height of the Rubáiyát's fame.

This program is in conjunction with The Persian Sensation: The Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyám in the West, which is on display through August 2. The year 2009 marks the 150th anniversary of Edward FitzGerald's landmark translation of the poetry of the medieval Persian astronomer Omar Khayyám. These gemlike verses about mortality, fate, and doubt became an unprecedented popular phenomenon in England and America but have since fallen into obscurity. Featuring 200 items from the Ransom Center's extensive collections, the exhibition narrates The Rubáiyát's history through such items as Persian manuscripts, miniature editions, and illustrated parodies.


2009 Amon Carter Lecture:
"Frida Kahlo: Her Art and Life" LECTURE THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 7 P.M.

For the 2009 Amon Carter Lecture, Hayden Herrera, art historian and biographer of Frida Kahlo, presents "Frida Kahlo: Her Art and Life" on Thursday, June 18, at 7 p.m.

Herrera's talk interweaves Frida Kahlo's art and life, focusing on her childhood, the accident that turned her to painting, her tumultuous marriage to the muralist Diego Rivera, Rivera's influence and other sources of inspiration for Kahlo's art, Kahlo's childlessness, her frequent surgeries, and her passionate love for her native Mexico.

Seating is free, but limited.

WATCH THIS EVENT

Herrera is a New York-based art historian and critic whose first book, Frida: A Biography of Frida Kahlo, was published in 1983 and in 2002 became the basis for a major motion picture. Her second full-length biography, Arshile Gorky: His Life and Work, published by Farrar, Straus & Giroux in 2003, was a finalist for a Pulitzer Prize. She has also written artist's biographies, including Mary Frank (1990), Matisse: A Portrait (1993), and Joan Snyder (2005). Herrera has curated a number of exhibitions, including a Frida Kahlo show that opened at the Chicago Museum of Contemporary Art in 1978 and traveled for a year in the United States. More recently she co-curated the Frida Kahlo centennial exhibition that opened at the Walker Art Center in 2007 and traveled to the Philadelphia Museum of Art and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. Currently she is working on a biography of the sculptor Isamu Noguchi.

Herrera's talk is in conjunction with the homecoming of one of the Ransom Center's most famous and frequently borrowed art works, Frida Kahlo's Self-portrait with Thorn Necklace and Hummingbird (1940). Since 1990 the painting has been on almost continuous loan, featured in exhibitions at 28 museums in the United States, Australia, Canada, France, and Spain. The portrait is on display at the Ransom Center from May 5 through January 3, 2010.

Watch video documentary A World of Interest: Frida Kahlo's Self-portrait with Thorn Necklace and Hummingbird


Orientalist Silents Film Series: The Sheik FILM SERIES THURSDAY, JUNE 11, 7 P.M.

To kick off the Orientalist Silents Film Series, the Harry Ransom Center screens George Melford's film The Sheik (1921), starring Rudolph Valentino, on Thursday, June 11, at 7 p.m.

Sheik Ahmed (Valentino) desperately desires fiesty British socialite Diana, so he abducts her and carries her off to his luxurious desert tent-palace. The free-spirited Diana recoils from his advances and yearns to be released. Only after being kidnapped by desert bandits does Diana realize she has grown to love Ahmed.

Seating is free, but limited.

The two silent films made about the life of Omar Khayyám are lost; in their place, these screenings offer a glimpse of Western attitudes toward an imagined Orient at the height of the Rubáiyát's fame.

This program is in conjunction with The Persian Sensation: The Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyám in the West, which is on display through August 2. The year 2009 marks the 150th anniversary of Edward FitzGerald's landmark translation of the poetry of the medieval Persian astronomer Omar Khayyám. These gemlike verses about mortality, fate, and doubt became an unprecedented popular phenomenon in England and America but have since fallen into obscurity. Featuring 200 items from the Ransom Center's extensive collections, the exhibition narrates The Rubáiyát's history through such items as Persian manuscripts, miniature editions, and illustrated parodies.


Poetry on the Plaza: Surrealism in Latin America READING WEDNESDAY, MAY 6, NOON

The Harry Ransom Center presents the Poetry on the Plaza event Surrealism in Latin America on Wednesday, May 6, at noon.

Inspired by the return of Frida Kahlo's Self-portrait with Thorn Necklace and Hummingbird (1940), which has been on loan to museums around the world, the Ransom Center celebrates Latin American surrealist poetry.

The painting will be on display at the Ransom Center from May 5 through January 3, 2010.

Enrique Fierro, Associate Professor in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese at The University of Texas at Austin, and Meredith Clark, Sean Manning, and Francisco Plata, graduate students in Hispanic Literature, read the poetry of Octavio Paz, Pablo Neruda, César Vallejo, and other Latin American surrealists.

Refreshments will be served at this free event.


In the Galleries: Frida Kahlo's Self-portrait with Thorn Necklace and Hummingbird OPENING TUESDAY, MAY 5, 10 A.M.–5 P.M.

The Ransom Center celebrates the homecoming of one of its most famous and frequently borrowed artworks, Frida Kahlo's Self-portrait with Thorn Necklace and Hummingbird (1940). The painting will be on display on the first floor through December 31, 2009.


Rubáiyát Film Series: The Keeper: The Legend of Omar Khayyám FILM SERIES TUESDAY, APRIL 28, 7 P.M.

The Rubáiyát Film Series continues with Kayvan Mashayekh's The Keeper: The Legend of Omar Khayyám (2005), starring Vanessa Redgrave and Adam Echahly, on Tuesday, April 28, at 7 p.m.

Kamran is a 12-year-old boy who is consumed by the responsibility of keeping the story of his heritage alive for future generations. Upon hearing a story from his dying brother, he travels from the United States to England and finally to Iran in search of the story of his ancestor, Omar Khayyám. The film takes the audience from the modern day to the epic past where the relationship between Omar Khayyám, Hassan Sabbah (the original creator of the sect of Assassins), and their mutual love for a beautiful woman separate them from their eternal bond of friendships.

Seating is free, but limited.

This program is in conjunction with The Persian Sensation: The Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyám in the West, which is on display through August 2. The year 2009 marks the 150th anniversary of Edward FitzGerald's landmark translation of the poetry of the medieval Persian astronomer Omar Khayyám. These gemlike verses about mortality, fate, and doubt became an unprecedented popular phenomenon in England and America but have since fallen into obscurity. Featuring 200 items from the Ransom Center's extensive collections, the exhibition narrates The Rubáiyát's history through such items as Persian manuscripts, miniature editions, and illustrated parodies.


Poetry on the Plaza: Marathon reading of Shake-speares Sonnets READING WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22, NOON

In a special Poetry on the Plaza event in honor of National Poetry Month, the Harry Ransom Center presents a marathon reading of Shake-speares Sonnets (1609) on Wednesday, April 22, at noon.

Shake-speares Sonnets turns 400 this year, and to celebrate, Shakespeare scholars, poets, and others will read from Shakes-speares Sonnets and The Lovers Complaint.

Birthday cake will be served at this free event to honor William Shakespeare's birthday on April 23.


Focus on Photography: Peter Feldstein LECTURE THURSDAY, APRIL 16, 7 P.M.

In a Focus on Photography event, photographer Peter Feldstein discusses his new book The Oxford Project, a 20-year project photographing and interviewing the residents of Oxford, Iowa, on Thursday, April 16, at 7 p.m. at the Harry Ransom Center. A book signing follows.

In 1984, photographer Peter Feldstein set out to photograph every single resident of his town, Oxford, Iowa (pop. 676). He converted an abandoned storefront on Main Street into a makeshift studio and posted flyers inviting people to stop by. At first they trickled in slowly, but in the end, nearly all of Oxford stood before Feldstein's lens.

Twenty years later, Feldstein decided to do it again. He invited writer Stephen G. Bloom to join him, and together they went in search of the Oxford residents Feldstein originally shot in 1984. Some had moved. Most had stayed. Others had passed away. All were marked by the passage of time.

What emerges is a living portrait of Small Town, USA, told with the words and images of its residents—then and now—and textured by their own words. It tells the compelling story of one archetypal American community—its struggles, accomplishments, failures, and secrets—and how it has both changed and stayed the same over the course of the years.

Feldstein will do a reading from the book with a narrated slide presentation, followed by a question-and-answer discussion.

Seating is free, but limited.


Music From the Collections: The Rubáiyát SongbookPERFORMANCE THURSDAY, APRIL 9, 7 P.M.

As part of the Harry Ransom Center's Music from the Collections series, students and faculty from the Southwestern University Department of Music present The Rubáiyát Songbook, a concert of old and new settings inspired by the Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyám on Thursday, April 9, at 7 p.m. at the Ransom Center.

Songs from the Ransom Center's collection are featured, including works by James Rogers, Benjamin Richmond, Richard Fidler, Arthur Whiting, and Arthur Foote. These settings and song parodies, mostly dating from around the turn of the twentieth century, will be performed side-by-side with brand new musical settings of the Rubáiyát by Southwestern faculty and student composers, including Assistant Professor of Music Jason Hoogerhyde, Ashley Foster, Jeff Elliott, Stephanie Stewart, Natalie Moore, and Stephanie Taylor.

Performers include Associate Professor of Music Bruce Cain singing baritone; Matthew Dorris and Matthew Harper singing tenor; Katie de la Vega, Leslie Collie, Brooke Lyssy, and Emily Price singing soprano; Natalie Moore singing mezzo-soprano; Jeff Elliott on violin; Natalie Phillips-Perkoff and Stephanie Stewart on cello; Zoe Martin on harp; Assistant Professor of Music Anna Carney on clarinet; and Assistant Professor of Music David Utterback on piano.

Seating is free, but limited.

This program is in conjunction with The Persian Sensation: The Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyám in the West, which is on display through August 2. The year 2009 marks the 150th anniversary of Edward FitzGerald's landmark translation of the poetry of the medieval Persian astronomer Omar Khayyám. These gemlike verses about mortality, fate, and doubt became an unprecedented popular phenomenon in England and America but have since fallen into obscurity. Featuring 200 items from the Ransom Center's extensive collections, the exhibition narrates The Rubáiyát's history through such items as Persian manuscripts, miniature editions, and illustrated parodies.

Media sponsor: Classical 89.5 KMFA


Harry Ransom Lecture: Ed Ruscha LECTURE THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 7 P.M.

As part of the Harry Ransom Lectures, artist Ed Ruscha discusses his life and work on Thursday, April 2, at 7 p.m. at the AT&T Conference Center Amphitheatre, located at 1900 University Avenue.

Seating is free, but limited. Doors will open at 6:30 p.m.

Born in 1937 in Omaha, Nebraska, Edward Ruscha moved to Los Angeles in 1956 to attend the Chouinard Art Institute. He had his first solo exhibition in 1963 at the Ferus Gallery in Los Angeles. He currently shows with the Gagosian Gallery in New York, Beverly Hills, and London.

Encompassing photography, drawing, painting, and artists' books, Ruscha's work has been the subject of retrospectives at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (1983), the Centre Georges Pompidou (1989), and the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden (2000). In 2001, Ruscha was elected to The American Academy of Arts and Letters as a member of the Department of Art. The following year a major exhibition of Ruscha's work opened in Spain at the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofia.

Leave Any Information at the Signal, a volume of Ruscha's writings, was published by MIT Press in 2002.

The Harry Ransom Lectures honor former University of Texas Chancellor Harry Ransom and highlight the Ransom Center's vital role in the University's intellectual and cultural life. The program brings internationally renowned writers, artists, and scholars to Austin for a public event and conversations with University students. The lectures are made possible by the generous support of the University Co-operative Society.

LEARN MORE about the Harry Ransom Lectures

AT&T CONFERENCE CENTER AMPHITHEATRE, 1900 University Avenue


Poetry on the Plaza: April Fools READING WEDNESDAY, APRIL 1, NOON

The Harry Ransom Center presents the Poetry on the Plaza event April Fools on Wednesday, April 1, at noon.

Readers will share poetic humor, wit, and satire in an attempt to make the "cruelest month" a little easier to bear.

Refreshments will be served at this free event.

In celebration of National Poetry Month, please mark your calendars for an additional Poetry on the Plaza event on Wednesday, April 22, at noon, for a marathon reading of Shakes-peares Sonnets.


Curators' Tour of Fritz Henle: In Search of Beauty TOUR THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 7 P.M.

Roy Flukinger, the Ransom Center's Senior Research Curator of Photography, leads a free gallery tour of Fritz Henle: In Search of Beauty on Thursday, March 26, at 7 p.m.

On display through August 2, this retrospective exhibition celebrates the art of freelance photographer Fritz Henle (1909-1993). A contributor to such magazines as LIFE and Harper's Bazaar, Henle had a distinctive style that was characterized by a unique combination of the realistic and the romantic. Featuring more than 100 photographs, this exhibition encompasses a broad range of Henle's work, including images of 1930s New York, Mexico, and Paris; innovative nudes; and portraits of famous personalities.

VIEW SLIDESHOW of images from the exhibition

Also the exhibition book Fritz Henle: In Search of Beauty is available in the Ransom Center's Online Store


Rubáiyát Film Series: The Wind Will Carry Us FILM SERIES TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 7 P.M.

The Rubáiyát Film Series continues with Iranian filmmaker Abbas Kiarostami's The Wind Will Carry Us (1999) on Tuesday, March 24, at 7 p.m. at the Harry Ransom Center.

The Wind Will Carry Us explores life and death, modern and traditional customs, and local and global issues through the story of a group of journalists and production engineers who arrive in a Kurdish village to document the locals' mourning rituals as they anticipate the death of an elderly woman. The film is in Farsi with English subtitles.

Seating is free, but limited.

This program is in conjunction with The Persian Sensation: The Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyám in the West, which is on display through August 2. The year 2009 marks the 150th anniversary of Edward FitzGerald's landmark translation of the poetry of the medieval Persian astronomer Omar Khayyám. These gemlike verses about mortality, fate, and doubt became an unprecedented popular phenomenon in England and America but have since fallen into obscurity. Featuring 200 items from the Ransom Center's extensive collections, the exhibition narrates The Rubáiyát's history through such items as Persian manuscripts, miniature editions, and illustrated parodies.

VIEW SLIDESHOW of images from the exhibition


Harry Ransom Lecture: Azar Nafisi LECTURE THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 7 P.M.

As part of the Harry Ransom Center Lecture Series, Azar Nafisi, author of Reading Lolita in Tehran, discusses the power of literature to influence culture on Thursday, March 12, at 7 p.m. at the AT&T Conference Center Ampitheatre.

Her latest book, Things I Have Been Silent About, is a memoir about her mother. A book signing follows.

Seating is free, but limited. Doors open 30 minutes prior to the event.

Nafisi is best known as the author of the bestseller Reading Lolita in Tehran: A Memoir in Books, a portrait of the Islamic revolution in Iran and how it affected one university professor and her students. Reading Lolita in Tehran is an incisive exploration of the transformative powers of fiction in a world of tyranny.

Nafisi is a Visiting Professor and the director of the Cultural Conversations at the Foreign Policy Institute of Johns Hopkins University's School of Advanced International Studies in Washington, D.C., where she is a professor of aesthetics, culture, and literature, and teaches courses on the relation between culture and politics.

Nafisi has written for The New York Times, Washington Post, and The Wall Street Journal.

The Harry Ransom Lectures honor former University of Texas Chancellor Harry Ransom and highlight the Ransom Center's vital role in the University's intellectual and cultural life. The program brings internationally renowned writers, artists, and scholars to Austin for a public event and conversations with University students. The lectures are made possible by the generous support of the University Co-operative Society.

LEARN MORE about the Harry Ransom Lectures

AT&T CONFERENCE CENTER AMPHITHEATRE, 1900 University Avenue


Explore UT EXPLORE UT SATURDAY, MARCH 7, NOON–5 P.M.

Family fun inspired by the current exhibitions.


"The World Every Week: Picture Magazines and the Golden Age of Photojournalism." LECTURE THURSDAY, MARCH 5, 7 P.M.

In a Focus on Photography event, Alison Nordstrom, Curator of Photographs at the George Eastman House, presents "The World Every Week: Picture Magazines and the Golden Age of Photojournalism" on Thursday, March 5, at 7 p.m. at the Harry Ransom Center.

The lecture, which is held in conjunction with the photography exhibition Fritz Henle: In Search of Beauty, explores the historical and cultural context of Henle's work. Nordstrom discusses the era of great American photo magazines, such as LIFE and Look, and how these publications were made, marketed, consumed, and understood both then and now.

Seating is free, but limited.

On display through August 2, Fritz Henle: In Search of Beauty celebrates the art of freelance photographer Fritz Henle (1909-1993). A contributor to such magazines as LIFE and Harper's Bazaar, Henle had a distinctive style that was characterized by a unique combination of the realistic and the romantic. Featuring more than 100 photographs, this exhibition encompasses a broad range of Henle's work, including images of 1930s New York, Mexico, and Paris; innovative nudes; and portraits of famous personalities.

VIEW SLIDESHOW of images from the exhibition

Also the exhibition book Fritz Henle: In Search of Beauty is available in the Ransom Center's Online Store


Poetry on the Plaza: Persian Poetry READING WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4, NOON

In conjunction with the exhibition The Persian Sensation: The Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyám in the West, the Harry Ransom Center presents the Poetry on the Plaza event Persian Poetry on Wednesday, March 4, at noon.

English graduate student Yaser Amad, Austin musician and artist Koorosh Angali, Middle Eastern Librarian Robin Dougherty, and Michelle Kaiserlian, co-curator of The Persian Sensation, will perform selections by Omar Khayyám, Rumi, and other classical Persian poets.

Refreshments will be served at this free event.

The year 2009 marks the 150th anniversary of Edward FitzGerald's landmark translation of the poetry of the medieval Persian astronomer Omar Khayyám. These gemlike verses about mortality, fate, and doubt became an unprecedented popular phenomenon in England and America but have since fallen into obscurity. Featuring 200 items from the Ransom Center's extensive collections, the exhibition narrates The Rubáiyát's history through such items as Persian manuscripts, miniature editions, and illustrated parodies. The exhibition is on display through August 2.


Music from the Collections: Anthony Burgess PERFORMANCE THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 7 P.M.

In a Music from the Collections program, Alan Roughley, Executive Director of the International Anthony Burgess Foundation, and pianist Dianne O'Hara read and perform works by Anthony Burgess on Thursday, February 26, at 7 p.m. at the Harry Ransom Center.

Readings include segments of A Clockwork Orange, This Man and Music, Nothing Like the Sun, and more. The musical performance will feature Preludes 1-6, Tango, Rhapsody, 2 Preludes and Fugues, among others.

Few people realize that the author of A Clockwork Orange was also an accomplished and respected modern composer and visual artist. The Ransom Center holds a significant collection of Burgess materials, including manuscripts of some of the works to be performed.

Seating is free, but limited. The event is co-sponsored by the International Anthony Burgess Foundation.

LEARN MORE about the Ransom Center's music collections

Also, mark your calendar for the second program in the series on April 9, when students and faculty from Southwestern University perform songs featured in the current exhibition, The Persian Sensation: The Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyám in the West, and their own musical compositions inspired by the stanzas of The Rubáiyát.

Media sponsor: Classical 89.5 KMFA


Rubáiyát Film Series: The Lives, Loves, and Adventures of Omar Khayyám FILM SERIES TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 7 P.M.

The Harry Ransom Center kicks off the Rubáiyát Film Series with William Dieterle's The Lives, Loves, and Adventures of Omar Khayyám (1957), starring Cornel Wilde, on Tuesday, February 24, at 7 p.m.

Little is known about Omar Khayyám, the Persian poet and mathematician from the eleventh century, but The Lives, Loves, and Adventures of Omar Khayyám imagines what his life might have been like as he romances a sultan's bride and foils an assassination plot.

Seating is free, but limited.

The film series is held in conjunction with the Ransom Center's exhibition The Persian Sensation: The Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyám in the West, on display through August 2. The year 2009 marks the 150th anniversary of Edward FitzGerald's landmark translation of the poetry of the medieval Persian astronomer Omar Khayyám. These gemlike verses about mortality, fate, and doubt became an unprecedented popular phenomenon in England and America but have since fallen into obscurity. Featuring 200 items from the Ransom Center's extensive collections, the exhibition narrates The Rubáiyát's history through such items as Persian manuscripts, miniature editions, and illustrated parodies.

VIEW SLIDESHOW of images from the exhibition


Curators' Tour of The Persian Sensation: The Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyám in the West TOUR THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 7 P.M.

Molly Schwartzburg, the Harry Ransom Center's Curator of British and American Literature, and Michelle Kaiserlian, guest curator, lead a gallery tour of The Persian Sensation: The Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyám in the West on Thursday, February 19, at 7 p.m. Admission is free.

The year 2009 marks the 150th anniversary of Edward FitzGerald's landmark translation of the poetry of the medieval Persian astronomer Omar Khayyám. These gemlike verses about mortality, fate, and doubt became an unprecedented popular phenomenon in England and America but have since fallen into obscurity. Featuring 200 items from the Ransom Center's extensive collections, the exhibition narrates The Rubáiyát's history through such items as Persian manuscripts, miniature editions, and illustrated parodies.

The exhibition is on display through August 2.

VIEW SLIDESHOW of images from the exhibition


Harry Ransom Lecture: David Mamet LECTURE THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 7 P.M.

In the second Harry Ransom Lecture, playwright, writer, and film director David Mamet joins The University of Texas at Austin President William Powers Jr. for a conversation about The Spanish Prisoner (1997) and a screening of the film. The event takes place Thursday, February 5, at 7 p.m. at the Texas Union Theatre.

Seating is free, but limited. Doors open at 6:30.

David Mamet is the author of the plays Romance, Boston Marriage, Oleanna, Glengarry Glen Ross (1984 Pulitzer Prize), American Buffalo, The Old Neighborhood, A Life in the Theatre, Speed-the-Plow, Sexual Perversity in Chicago, Reunion and The Cryptogram (1995 Obie Award), and November. His films include The Postman Always Rings Twice, The Verdict, The Untouchables, House of Games (writer/director), Oleanna (writer/director), Homicide (writer/director), The Spanish Prisoner (writer/director), Hoffa, The Edge, Wag the Dog, The Winslow Boy (writer/director), Hannibal, State and Main (writer/director), and Heist (writer/director).

His most recent books include the acting books, True and False and Three Uses of the Knife, and Bambi vs. Godzilla, On the Nature, Purpose, and Practice of the Movie Business. His film Redbelt premiered in spring 2008.

David Mamet's papers are housed at the Ransom Center and will be available for research in spring 2009.

VIEW MAMET PAPERS IMAGE GALLERY

The Harry Ransom Lectures honor former University of Texas Chancellor Harry Huntt Ransom and highlight the Ransom Center's vital role in the University's intellectual and cultural life. The program brings internationally renowned writers, artists, and scholars to Austin for a public event and conversations with University students. The lectures are made possible by the generous support of the University Co-operative Society.

LEARN MORE about the Harry Ransom Lectures

TEXAS UNION THEATRE


Poetry on the Plaza: The Rossetti Circle READING WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 4, NOON

The Harry Ransom Center presents the first Poetry on the Plaza event of the spring, The Rossetti Circle, on Wednesday, February 4, at noon.

Poet, painter, and designer Dante Gabriel Rossetti was at the heart of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood. Rossetti and his circle sought to reform the arts, looking for inspiration in nature. They also "discovered" Edward FitzGerald's translation, the Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyám, in 1861 and helped set it on its path to popularity.

Join readers Katharine Beutner, English graduate student and author of the forthcoming novel, Alcestis; Betty Sue Flowers, Director of the LBJ Library and Museum; Carol MacKay, Professor in the Department of English; and Molly Schwartzburg, Ransom Center Curator of British and American Literature. Enjoy listening to works by Dante Gabriel Rossetti, Algernon Charles Swinburne, Robert Browning, Christina Rossetti, and William Morris and follow the remarkable path of FitzGerald's translation in the new exhibition The Persian Sensation: The Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyám in the West.

The year 2009 marks the 150th anniversary of FitzGerald's landmark translation of the poetry of the medieval Persian astronomer Omar Khayyám. These gemlike verses about mortality, fate, and doubt became an unprecedented popular phenomenon in England and America but have since fallen into obscurity. Featuring 200 items from the Ransom Center's extensive collections, the exhibition narrates The Rubáiyát's history through such items as Persian manuscripts, miniature editions, and illustrated parodies. The exhibition is on display through August 2.


"The Life and Legacy of Fritz Henle" PANEL TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 7 P.M.

In conjunction with the exhibition Fritz Henle: In Search of Beauty, photographer Fritz Henle's widow Marguerite and daughter Tina Henle discuss his life and legacy on Tuesday, February 3, at 7 p.m. at the Harry Ransom Center. The discussion is moderated by Roy Flukinger, the Ransom Center's Senior Research Curator of Photography and curator of the exhibition.

Seating is free, but limited.

WATCH THIS EVENT

This retrospective exhibition, opening on February 3, celebrates the art of freelance photographer Fritz Henle (1909–1993). A contributor to such magazines as LIFE and Harper's Bazaar, Henle had a distinctive style that was characterized by a unique combination of the realistic and the romantic. Featuring more than 100 photographs, this exhibition encompasses a broad range of Henle's work, including images of 1930s New York, Mexico, and Paris; nudes; and portraits of famous personalities.

VIDEO PREVIEW of the exhibition


Harry Ransom Lecture: Barry Unsworth LECTURE MONDAY, JANUARY 26, 7 P.M.

In the first of the Harry Ransom Lectures, writer Barry Unsworth discusses his new book, Land of Marvels, on Monday, January 26, at 7 p.m. at the Ransom Center. A book signing follows.

Barry Unsworth is a celebrated novelist who won the Booker Prize for Sacred Hunger, a novel about the eighteenth-century slave trade that is widely considered his masterpiece. Unsworth was a Booker Prize finalist for Morality Play and Pascali's Island, which was adapted into the acclaimed film starring Ben Kingsley and Helen Mirren. He was nominated for the Booker Prize for The Ruby in Her Navel. His other works include The Songs of the Kings, After Hannibal, and Losing Nelson. He lives in Italy.

Barry Unsworth's papers are housed at the Ransom Center.

The Harry Ransom Lectures honor former University of Texas Chancellor Harry Huntt Ransom and highlight the Ransom Center's vital role in the University's intellectual and cultural life. The program brings internationally renowned writers, artists, and scholars to Austin for public events and conversations with University students. The lectures are made possible by the generous support of the University Co-operative Society.

LEARN MORE about the Harry Ransom Lectures



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