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FALL 2010

Curator's Tour of Discovering the Language of Photography: The Gernsheim Collection TOUR TUESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 7 P.M.

David Coleman, the Ransom Center's Curator of Photography, leads a free gallery tour of Discovering the Language of Photography: The Gernsheim Collection, on Tuesday, December 7, at 7 p.m. at the Ransom Center.

Drawn from the peerless collection of Helmut and Alison Gernsheim, the exhibition features masterpieces from photography's first 150 years, alongside other images that, while lesser known, are integral to the medium's history. Highlights include the first photograph (on permanent display at the Ransom Center); works by nineteenth-century masters such as Lewis Carroll, Julia Margaret Cameron, and Henry Peach Robinson; and iconic images by modern photographers such as Man Ray, Robert Capa, Edward Weston, and Henri Cartier-Bresson.

If you are unable to attend the curator's tour, free docent-led tours of this exhibition are offered Tuesdays at noon and Saturdays at 2 p.m. The exhibition runs through January 2.


"Winston Churchill's Public Library" LECTURE THURSDAY, DECEMBER 2, 7 P.M.

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Drew University historian Jonathan Rose delivers the inaugural Donald G. Davis, Jr. Lecture, "Winston Churchill's Public Library" on Thursday, December 2, at 7 p.m. at the Harry Ransom Center.

In his lecture, Rose explores the relationship between politicians and literature. Are politicians' agendas molded by literature? How far are their policies and tactics shaped by poetry, prose, and drama? Rose focuses on the career of Winston Churchill by examining the books he read. George Bernard Shaw, H. G. Wells, John Galsworthy, and Siegfried Sassoon; The Red Badge of Courage, The Good Earth, Gone With The Wind, and 1984—these and many other books and authors exerted a powerful influence on Churchill and his brilliant career.

Rose is the William R. Kenan Professor of History at Drew University. He was the founding president for the Society of the History of Authorship, Reading, and Publishing. His publications include A Companion to the History of the Book (with Simon Eliot), The Intellectual Life of the British Working Classes, and The Holocaust and the Book: Destruction and Preservation.

Please be aware that the Ransom Center's Charles Nelson Prothro Theater has limited seating. Line forms upon arrival of the first person, and doors open 30 minutes in advance.


Poetry on the Plaza: Harmonica Bob: The Poetry of Bob Dylan READING WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 1, NOON

The Harry Ransom Center presents the Poetry on the Plaza event Harmonica Bob: The Poetry of Bob Dylan on Wednesday, December 1, at noon. Thomas G. Palaima, Dickson Centennial Professor of Classics and Director of the Program in Aegean Scripts and Prehistory at The University of Texas at Austin, is the featured reader.

Few songster poets have had their words so scrutinized, analyzed, criticized, problematized, and misunderstood as Bob Dylan. Even before he deserted traditional folk singing to write his own styles of verse, Dylan had to correct astute social critic Studs Terkel on the air (May 1, 1963) and insist that the hard rain that was gonna fall was not, as Terkel had asserted, nuclear fallout rain.

One instrument that has served Dylan himself well, besides guitar and piano, is the harmonica. In this presentation, Palaima traces Dylan's early mastery and developed use of the instrument that is so expressive as a poetic song tool in folk and blues traditions.

Dylan has used the harmonica from his earliest days to the present—and most notably in acoustic sets during the 1966 tour—to express emotions and meanings that were literally ineffable for many reasons. He has also used the instrument to highlight key passages in songs. In a way, it serves as a mode of expression that cannot be interpreted or misinterpreted.

Examples illustrating this phenomenon of "unspoken poetry" will be drawn from Palaima's extensive collection of bootleg recordings from 1961 to 2010. He argues that at many points in the poetic structures of his songs, Dylan uses the harmonica where words would literally fail.

Refreshments will be served at this free event.


"Proust, Paintings, and the Making of À la recherche du temps perdu" LECTURE THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 7 P.M.

Artist and writer Eric Karpeles delivers the biennial Amon Carter Lecture, "Proust, Paintings, and the Making of À la recherche du temps perdu" on Thursday, November 11, at 7 p.m.

In his talk, Karpeles uses projected images and passages of text read aloud to render more accessible a famously complex literary masterwork. By focusing on the wealth of visual imagery found in Proust's novel of multiple volumes, Karpeles breaks through the intimidating aura surrounding the book to reveal the treasures hidden within. The talk offers audience members a window into a twentieth-century icon and a better understanding of its prolonged creation.

Karpeles is the author of Paintings in Proust, an illustrated companion guide to the visual references in À la recherche du temps perdu, and translator of Proust's Overcoat. Born in New York City, he lives in Northern California, where he paints and writes about painting, poetry, and aesthetics.

Please be aware that the Ransom Center's Charles Nelson Prothro Theater has limited seating. Line forms upon arrival of the first person, doors open 30 minutes in advance.


"The Colorful Print: Photography before 1843" WORKSHOP SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 9 A.M.-5 P.M.

Artist-educators and historians Mark Osterman and France Scully Osterman conduct "The Colorful Print: Photography before 1843." Participants will learn how to make photogenic drawings, cyanotypes, and chromatypes using formulas from several early inventors to achieve a variety of surprising hues. Pre-registration and payment required. Enrollment limited. Details at www.hrc.utexas.edu/workshop.

Registration is closed.


Member Tour TOUR SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 6

Cathy Henderson, Associate Director of Exhibitions and Education, leads an exclusive tour of restricted-access areas of the building, including the cataloging, technology, and conservation departments, and collection storage. Open to Guild level members and above; limited capacity; RSVP required. Join, upgrade, or renew at www.hrc.utexas.edu/memevents.


"Early Inventors of Photography" LECTURE THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 7 P.M.

Mark Osterman and France Scully Osterman, historians, artists, and modern masters of the wet-plate collodion process, discuss the role of historical photographic processes in their work on Thursday, November 4, at 7 p.m.

They will also discuss and showcase the types of colorful prints produced by early inventors of photography, such as Hercules Florence, W. H. Fox Talbot, Sir John Herschel, and Robert Hunt, and show the types of colorful prints they produced.

This event is held in conjunction with the exhibition Discovering the Language of Photography: The Gernsheim Collection, on display through January 2. Drawn from the peerless collection of Helmut and Alison Gernsheim, the exhibition features masterpieces from photography's first 150 years, alongside other images that, while lesser known, are integral to the medium's history. Highlights include the first photograph (on permanent display at the Ransom Center); works by nineteenth-century masters such as Lewis Carroll, Julia Margaret Cameron, and Henry Peach Robinson; and iconic images by modern photographers such as Man Ray, Robert Capa, Edward Weston, and Henri Cartier-Bresson.

Please be aware that the Ransom Center's Charles Nelson Prothro Theater has limited seating. Line forms upon arrival of the first person, and doors open 30 minutes in advance.


Poetry on the Plaza: Poets from the Age of Mark Twain READING WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, NOON

Poetry on the Plaza: Poets from the Age of Mark Twain


"Civility in a Fractured Society" HARRY RANSOM LECTURE THURSDAY, OCTOBER 28, 7 P.M.

The University Co-op presents a Harry Ransom Lectures event with National Endowment for the Humanities Chairman Jim Leach on Thursday, October 28, at 7 p.m. Leach, who is visiting all 50 states and speaking on the importance of civility in public discourse, will discuss "Civility in a Fractured Society."

Members of the Harry Ransom Center receive complimentary parking and priority entry at this program. Doors open at 6:20 p.m. for members and at 6:30 p.m. for the general public. Members must present their membership cards for priority entrance; one seat per membership card. Members arriving after 6:30 p.m. will join the general queue. Complimentary parking for members is available at the University Co-op garage at 23rd and San Antonio streets.

The Harry Ransom Lectures honor former University of Texas Chancellor Harry Huntt Ransom and highlight the Ransom Center's vital role in the University's intellectual and cultural life. The program brings internationally renowned writers, artists, and scholars to Austin for public events and conversations with University students. The lectures are made possible by the generous support of the University Co-op.


Kenneth Turan and the Harry Ransom Center present Sweet Smell of Success Screening FRIDAY, OCTOBER 21, NOON at Alamo Drafthouse Ritz

The Austin Film Festival hosts a screening of Sweet Smell of Success, presented by Kenneth Turan, film critic at the Los Angeles Times. The film was co-written by and based on a novella by Ernest Lehman, whose collection is housed at the Ransom Center.

Ticketed event; badges or passes required.

For more information on the screening and to purchase passes or badges for the Austin Film Festival, visit austinfilmfestival.com.

Alamo Drafthouse Ritz


"The Lives and Work of Helmut and Alison Gernsheim" DISCUSSION TUESDAY, OCTOBER 19, 7 P.M.

J. B. Colson, Professor Emeritus of Journalism and Fellow of the Dolph Briscoe Center for American History, and Roy Flukinger, Ransom Center Senior Research Curator, discuss the lives and work of Helmut and Alison Gernsheim on Tuesday, October 19, at 7 p.m.

This event is held in conjunction with the exhibition Discovering the Language of Photography: The Gernsheim Collection, on display through January 2, and the release of the book The Gernsheim Collection.

Drawn from the peerless collection of Helmut and Alison Gernsheim, the exhibition features masterpieces from photography's first 150 years, alongside other images that, while lesser known, are integral to the medium's history. Highlights include the first photograph (on permanent display at the Ransom Center); works by nineteenth-century masters such as Lewis Carroll, Julia Margaret Cameron, and Henry Peach Robinson; and iconic images by modern photographers such as Man Ray, Robert Capa, Edward Weston, and Henri Cartier-Bresson.

The book includes more than 125 full-page plates from the collection, accompanied by descriptions of each image's place in the evolution of photography and within the collection. The catalog also traces the Gernsheims' passion for collecting and their career as pioneering historians of photography, showing how their efforts significantly contributed to the acceptance of photography as a fine art and as a field worthy of intellectual study.

A book signing of The Gernsheim Collection follows.

Please be aware that the Ransom Center's Charles Nelson Prothro Theater has limited seating. Line forms upon arrival of the first person, and doors open 30 minutes in advance.


Texas Book Festival: "David Foster Wallace: A Writer's Life" DISCUSSION SATURDAY, OCTOBER 16, 3:30 P.M. at THE PARAMOUNT THEATRE

The Harry Ransom Center and the Texas Book Festival present a panel on the life and work of David Foster Wallace (1962–2008) on Saturday, October 16, at 3:30 p.m. at the Paramount Theatre.

The panel includes David Lipsky, who spent five days with Wallace in 1996 on assignment from Rolling Stone—an assignment that came to fruition just this year, as his highly praised Although of Course You End Up Becoming Yourself: A Road Trip with David Foster Wallace was published. Wallace's friends and fellow writers David Means and Antonya Nelson join the conversation about Wallace's books and life.

Moderator Matt Bucher is the administrator of Wallace-l, the David Foster Wallace listserv. He is the publisher of two books on Wallace's work (Elegant Complexity: A Reader's Guide to Infinite Jest and Consider David Foster Wallace: Critical Essays). Bucher is an editor at Houghton Mifflin Harcourt and lives in Austin.

Wallace's archive is housed at the Ransom Center and opened for research earlier this fall. Learn more at www.hrc.utexas.edu/dfw.

PARAMOUNT THEATRE


A Conversation with Charles R. Larson DISCUSSION THURSDAY, OCTOBER 14, 7 P.M.

Charles R. Larson of American University speaks about his collection of African, African American, and Native American literature, acquired by the Harry Ransom Center in 2009. Bernth Lindfors, University of Texas at Austin Emeritus Professor of English, hosts the conversation on Thursday, October 14, at 7 p.m. at the Ransom Center.

Throughout his career, Larson befriended many of the writers featured in his collection, corresponded with them, and anthologized many of their works. His collection includes signed and inscribed books, rare publications, unique manuscripts, and letters. There are more than 1,100 books by African writers, 250 books by African American and Caribbean writers, and 60 books by Native American writers.

Printed highlights include inscribed copies of major works of African, African American, and Native American literature; substantial runs of African literary magazines, including the foundational Nigerian journal Black Orpheus; and more than 120 Onitsha Market pamphlets, an important form of Nigerian popular literature.

Please be aware that the Ransom Center's Charles Nelson Prothro Theater has limited seating. Line forms upon arrival of the first person, and doors open 30 minutes in advance.


Member Event RECEPTION WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 13

Enjoy a night of special access to the Ransom Center at this insiders' open house and reception for new members. Invitation-only; RSVP required. Become a member today at www.hrc.utexas.edu/memevents.


Poetry on the Plaza: The Language of Photography READING WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 6, NOON

The Harry Ransom Center presents the Poetry on the Plaza event The Language of Photography on Wednesday, October 6, at noon.

Held in conjunction with the current exhibition Discovering the Language of Photography: The Gernsheim Collection, the event includes photographers reading poetry about photography. Readers include Roy Flukinger, Ransom Center senior research curator; Geoff Winningham, photographer, filmmaker, and journalist; and Matt Valentine, photographer and program coordinator of the Joynes Reading Room at The University of Texas at Austin.

Refreshments will be served at this free event.

Mark your calendar for the next Poetry on the Plaza event: Poets from the Age of Mark Twain on Wednesday, November 3.


Flair Symposium: Shaping the History of Photography SYMPOSIUM THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 30-SATURDAY, OCTOBER 2

The ninth biennial Flair Symposium, "Shaping the History of Photography," explores trends and issues in collecting, exhibiting, publishing, and the historiography of photography. Pre-registration and payment required. Details at www.hrc.utexas.edu/flair.


Poetry on the Plaza: Actors from the London Stage: Greece is the Word READING WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, NOON

To kick off the 2010-2011 Poetry on the Plaza season, the Harry Ransom Center presents the event Greece is the Word on Wednesday, September 29, at noon.

Paul O'Mahony, touring with Actors from the London Stage, reads excerpts from the great poets of the ancient world. Encompassing the epic of Homer and the toilet humor of Aristophanes, the program offers a fresh and exciting look at the enduring influence of Greece in our world today.

Refreshments will be served at this free event.

Pick up a free poster and bookmark with the 2010-2011 Poetry on the Plaza schedule at the visitor desk in the Ransom Center lobby.


Austin Museum Day TOUR SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, NOON-5 P.M.

Ransom Center photography curators and conservators answer questions about identifying, preserving, and storing photographs from 2 to 4 p.m. Docent-led tours of the exhibition begin at noon, 2, and 4 p.m.


Curator's Tour of Discovering the Language of Photography: The Gernsheim Collection TOUR THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 7 P.M.

David Coleman, the Ransom Center's Curator of Photography, leads a free gallery tour of Discovering the Language of Photography: The Gernsheim Collection, on Thursday, September 16, at 7 p.m. at the Ransom Center.

Drawn from the peerless collection of Helmut and Alison Gernsheim, the exhibition features masterpieces from photography's first 150 years, alongside other images that, while lesser known, are integral to the medium's history. Highlights include the first photograph (on permanent display at the Ransom Center); works by nineteenth-century masters such as Lewis Carroll, Julia Margaret Cameron, and Henry Peach Robinson; and iconic images by modern photographers such as Man Ray, Robert Capa, Edward Weston, and Henri Cartier-Bresson.

If you are unable to attend the curator's tour, free docent-led tours of this exhibition are offered Tuesdays at noon and Saturdays at 2 p.m. The exhibition runs through January 2.


Consider the Archive: An Evening of David Foster Wallace READING TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 7 P.M.

The Harry Ransom Center commemorates the opening of the David Foster Wallace archive with readings of Wallace's work by writers and actors on Tuesday, September 14, at 7 p.m. in Jessen Auditorium in Homer Rainey Hall.

Readers, including Elizabeth Crane, Doug Dorst, Owen Egerton, Chris Gibson, and Jake Silverstein, share selections of Wallace's fiction, essays, and correspondence. Wallace's archive is housed at the Ransom Center.

Seating is free, but limited. Line forms upon arrival of the first person, with doors opening 30 minutes in advance.

A reception and small display of materials from the Wallace archive follow at the Ransom Center.

Co-sponsored by American Short Fiction and Salvage Vanguard Theater.

JESSEN AUDITORIUM


Picture Perfect Evening OPENING FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 6 P.M.

Join us for a Picture Perfect Evening, the opening reception for the exhibition Discovering the Language of Photography: The Gernsheim Collection. Free for Ransom Center members; $20 for non-members. Details at www.hrc.utexas.edu/pictureperfect.


SPRING 2010

Casino MAKING MOVIES FILM SERIES THURSDAY, JULY 22, 7 P.M.

The Making Movies Film Series concludes at the Harry Ransom Center with Martin Scorsese's Casino (1995), starring Robert De Niro, Sharon Stone, and Joe Pesci, on Thursday, July 22, at 7 p.m.

Sam "Ace" Rothstein is a mobster and casino manager in Las Vegas who falls in love with and marries Ginger, a hustler. Trouble ensues when Ace's childhood friend, Nicky Santoro, sent by the Mafia, shows up with an agenda of his own.

Please be aware that the Ransom Center's Charles Nelson Prothro Theater has limited seating. Line forms upon arrival of the first person, with doors opening 30 minutes in advance.

VIEW TRAILER

This program is in conjunction with the exhibition Making Movies. Featuring items from the Ransom Center's extensive film collections, Making Movies reveals the collaborative nature of the filmmaking process and focuses on how the artists involved—from writers to directors, actors to cinematographers—transform the written word into moving image.

The Ransom Center holds Robert De Niro's archive.

Visit the galleries, open until 7 p.m. on Thursdays, before attending the screenings.

182 minutes / Rated R


Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? MAKING MOVIES FILM SERIES THURSDAY, JULY 15, 7 P.M.

The Making Movies Film Series continues at the Harry Ransom Center with Mike Nichols's Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (1966), starring Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton, on Thursday, July 15, at 7 p.m.

Beneath their polished exterior, George and his wife, Martha, have a less than perfect marriage. Fueled by alcohol, they verbally abuse, attack, and berate each other. One night, George and Martha invite a young married couple, Nick and Honey, over for a nightcap. Nick and Honey quickly become embroiled in George and Martha's dysfunction.

Please be aware that the Ransom Center's Charles Nelson Prothro Theater has limited seating. Line forms upon arrival of the first person, and doors open 30 minutes in advance.

VIEW TRAILER

The Making Movies Film Series highlights films featured in the current Making Movies exhibition. Featuring items from the Ransom Center's extensive film collections, the exhibition reveals the collaborative nature of the filmmaking process and focuses on how the artists involved—from writers to directors, actors to cinematographers—transform the written word into moving image.

Visit the galleries, open until 7 p.m. on Thursdays, before attending the screenings.

131 minutes / Not Rated


Harry Ransom Center Member Night
at the Paramount Theatre MEMBER EVENT TUESDAY, JULY 13, 6 P.M.

Members are invited to a reception and screening of Sunset Boulevard, part of the Paramount Summer Classic Film Series.

At 6 p.m., enjoy a Ransom Center members-only pre-show reception, with a cash bar, on the second floor. Members receive free admission and reserved seating at the 7 p.m. screening of Sunset Boulevard, plus complimentary popcorn and soft drinks. Please bring your membership card to the event. Open to all Ransom Center members, but RSVP requested by Wednesday, July 7, 2010 to 512-232-3669 or rsvp@hrc.utexas.edu.

Paramount Theatre
713 Congress Avenue


Detour MAKING MOVIES FILM SERIES THURSDAY, JULY 8, 7 P.M.

The Making Movies Film Series continues at the Harry Ransom Center with Edgar G. Ulmer's Detour (1945), starring Tom Neal and Ann Savage, on Thursday, July 8, at 7 p.m.

After his girlfriend moves to Hollywood, Al Roberts decides to hitchhike west to join her. He finds a ride with Charles Haskell, who mysteriously dies. Afraid the police won't believe he's innocent, Al dumps the body and takes Charles's identity, leading him into deeper trouble.

Please be aware that the Ransom Center's Charles Nelson Prothro Theater has limited seating. Line forms upon arrival of the first person, and doors open 30 minutes in advance.

VIEW TRAILER

The Making Movies Film Series highlights films featured in the current Making Movies exhibition. Featuring items from the Ransom Center's extensive film collections, the exhibition reveals the collaborative nature of the filmmaking process and focuses on how the artists involved—from writers to directors, actors to cinematographers—transform the written word into moving image.

The Ransom Center holds the archive of Detour star Ann Savage.

Visit the galleries, open until 7 p.m. on Thursdays, before attending the screenings.

67 minutes / Not Rated


North by Northwest MAKING MOVIES FILM SERIES THURSDAY, JUNE 24, 7 P.M.

The Making Movies Film Series continues at the Harry Ransom Center with Alfred Hitchcock's North by Northwest (1959), starring Cary Grant and Eva Marie Saint, on Thursday, June 24, at 7 p.m.

In this Hitchcock thriller, a group of spies kidnap Madison Avenue advertising executive Roger Thornhill, mistaking him for a CIA agent. Thornhill escapes, and accompanied by the beautiful Eve, he races across the country to find the real agent and clear his name. Screenwriter Ernest Lehman called North by Northwest the "Hitchcock picture to end all Hitchcock pictures."

Please be aware that the Ransom Center's Charles Nelson Prothro Theater has limited seating. Line forms upon arrival of the first person, and doors open 30 minutes in advance.

VIEW TRAILER

The Making Movies Film Series highlights films featured in the current Making Movies exhibition. Featuring items from the Ransom Center's extensive film collections, the exhibition reveals the collaborative nature of the filmmaking process and focuses on how the artists involved—from writers to directors, actors to cinematographers—transform the written word into moving image.

Visit the galleries, open until 7 p.m. on Thursdays, before attending the screenings.

VIEW SLIDESHOW of photos that Lehman took while researching the film.

136 minutes / Not Rated


The Thrill of the Chase:
An Evening with Ransom Center Director Tom Staley MEMBER EVENT WEDNESDAY, JUNE 23, 6:30 P.M.

At this members-only celebration, Tom Staley will discuss the history of the Ransom Center and share his adventures across Europe and the United States searching for manuscripts, archives, and books in the attics, basements, sheds, and leaky apartments of many of the greatest writers and artists of our time.

Lite bites and wine to follow.

Complimentary parking at the University Co-op Garage, 23rd and San Antonio Streets.

Become a member today


Black Narcissus MAKING MOVIES FILM SERIES THURSDAY, JUNE 17, 7 P.M.

The Making Movies Film Series continues at the Harry Ransom Center with Black Narcissus (1947), starring Deborah Kerr and David Farrar, and directed by Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger, on Thursday, June 17, at 7 p.m.

In this controversial psychological drama, five British nuns set up a remote convent in the Himalayas. The nuns soon find themselves seduced by a handsome British agent, famously leading to one nun's violent nervous breakdown.

Please be aware that the Ransom Center's Charles Nelson Prothro Theater has limited seating. Line forms upon arrival of the first person, and doors open 30 minutes in advance.

VIEW TRAILER

The Making Movies Film Series highlights films featured in the current Making Movies exhibition. Featuring items from the Ransom Center's extensive film collections, the exhibition reveals the collaborative nature of the filmmaking process and focuses on how the artists involved—from writers to directors, actors to cinematographers—transform the written word into moving image.

Visit the galleries, open until 7 p.m. on Thursdays, before attending the screenings.

LEARN MORE about the production design by Alfred Junge in Black Narcissus.

100 minutes / Not Rated


Duel in the Sun MAKING MOVIES FILM SERIES THURSDAY, JUNE 10, 7 P.M.

The Harry Ransom Center kicks off its Making Movies Film Series with King Vidor's Duel in the Sun (1946), featuring Jennifer Jones and Gregory Peck, on Thursday, June 10, at 7 p.m.

This epic western, nicknamed "Lust in the Dust," follows Pearl Chavez when she is sent to live with distant relatives in Texas. Her relationships with the family's two sons, the responsible Jesse and unruly Lewt, lead to family feuds and, ultimately, a duel in the sun.

Please be aware that the Ransom Center's Charles Nelson Prothro Theater has limited seating. Line forms upon arrival of the first person, and doors open 30 minutes in advance.

VIEW TRAILER

The Making Movies Film Series highlights films featured in the current Making Movies exhibition. Featuring items from the Ransom Center's extensive film collections, the exhibition reveals the collaborative nature of the filmmaking process and focuses on how the artists involved—from writers to directors, actors to cinematographers—transform the written word into moving image.

Visit the galleries, open until 7 p.m. on Thursdays, before attending the screenings.

138 minutes / Not Rated


Cuartelazo (Mutiny, 1976) Mexican Revolution Films of the 70s Film Series THURSDAY, MAY 27, 7 P.M.

The Harry Ransom Center and Cine Las Americas presents the Mexican Revolution Films of the 70s series with Cuartelazo (Mutiny, 1976), directed by Alberto Isaac, on Thursday, May 27, at 7 p.m. at the Harry Ransom Center.

The series is held in conjunction with the Ransom Center's exhibition ¡Viva! Mexico's Independence and as part of the year-round celebrations of the bicentennial of Mexico's independence from Spain and the centennial of the Mexican Revolution.

All films are in Spanish with English subtitles. Please be aware that the Ransom Center's Charles Nelson Prothro Theater has free, but limited seating. Line forms upon arrival of the first person, and doors open 30 minutes in advance.

¡Viva! Mexico's Independence showcases materials from the Ransom Center's collections, including the 1529 document appointing Hernán Cortés Captain General of New Spain; unpublished letters exchanged between Ferdinand Maximilian, Emperor of Mexico, and his wife Carlotta; documentary photographs of the Mexican Revolution; and period broadsides illustrated by José Guadalupe Posada. The exhibition runs through August 1.

Co-sponsored by Cine Las Americas


La casta divina (The Divine Caste, 1976) Mexican Revolution Films of the 70s Film Series THURSDAY, MAY 20, 7 P.M.

The Harry Ransom Center and Cine Las Americas presents the Mexican Revolution Films of the 70s series with La casta divina (The Divine Caste, 1976), directed by Julián Pastor, on Thursday, May 20, at 7 p.m. at the Harry Ransom Center.

The series is held in conjunction with the Ransom Center's exhibition ¡Viva! Mexico's Independence and as part of the year-round celebrations of the bicentennial of Mexico's independence from Spain and the centennial of the Mexican Revolution.

All films are in Spanish with English subtitles. Please be aware that the Ransom Center's Charles Nelson Prothro Theater has free, but limited seating. Line forms upon arrival of the first person, and doors open 30 minutes in advance.

Mark your calendars for the final film in the series, Cuartelazo (Mutiny, 1976), on May 27.

¡Viva! Mexico's Independence showcases materials from the Ransom Center's collections, including the 1529 document appointing Hernán Cortés Captain General of New Spain; unpublished letters exchanged between Ferdinand Maximilian, Emperor of Mexico, and his wife Carlotta; documentary photographs of the Mexican Revolution; and period broadsides illustrated by José Guadalupe Posada. The exhibition runs through August 1.

Co-sponsored by Cine Las Americas


Cananea (1976) Mexican Revolution Films of the 70s Film Series THURSDAY, MAY 13, 7 P.M.

The Harry Ransom Center and Cine Las Americas presents the Mexican Revolution Films of the 70s series with Cananea (1976), directed by Marcela Fernández Violante, on Thursday, May 13, at 7 p.m. at the Harry Ransom Center.

The series is held in conjunction with the Ransom Center's exhibition ¡Viva! Mexico's Independence and as part of the year-round celebrations of the bicentennial of Mexico's independence from Spain and the centennial of the Mexican Revolution.

All films are in Spanish with English subtitles. Please be aware that the Ransom Center's Charles Nelson Prothro Theater has free, but limited seating. Line forms upon arrival of the first person, and doors open 30 minutes in advance.

Mark your calendars for other films in the series: La casta divina (The Divine Caste, 1976) on May 20 and Cuartelazo (Mutiny, 1976) on May 27.

¡Viva! Mexico's Independence showcases materials from the Ransom Center's collections, including the 1529 document appointing Hernán Cortés Captain General of New Spain; unpublished letters exchanged between Ferdinand Maximilian, Emperor of Mexico, and his wife Carlotta; documentary photographs of the Mexican Revolution; and period broadsides illustrated by José Guadalupe Posada. The exhibition runs through August 1.

Co-sponsored by Cine Las Americas


El principio (The Beginning, 1972) Mexican Revolution Films of the 70s Film Series THURSDAY, MAY 6, 7 P.M.

The Harry Ransom Center and Cine Las Americas kick off the Mexican Revolution Films of the 70s series with El principio (The Beginning, 1972), directed by Gonzalo Martínez Ortega, on Thursday, May 6, at 7 p.m. at the Harry Ransom Center.

The series is held in conjunction with the Ransom Center's exhibition ¡Viva! Mexico's Independence and as part of the year-round celebrations of the bicentennial of Mexico's independence from Spain and the centennial of the Mexican Revolution.

All films are in Spanish with English subtitles. Please be aware that the Ransom Center's Charles Nelson Prothro Theater has free, but limited seating. Line forms upon arrival of the first person, and doors open 30 minutes in advance.

Mark your calendars for other films in the series: Cananea (1976) on May 13, La casta divina (The Divine Caste, 1976) on May 20, and Cuartelazo (Mutiny, 1976) on May 27.

¡Viva! Mexico's Independence showcases materials from the Ransom Center's collections, including the 1529 document appointing Hernán Cortés Captain General of New Spain; unpublished letters exchanged between Ferdinand Maximilian, Emperor of Mexico, and his wife Carlotta; documentary photographs of the Mexican Revolution; and period broadsides illustrated by José Guadalupe Posada. The exhibition runs through August 1.

Co-sponsored by Cine Las Americas


J. M. Coetzee LECTURE WEDNESDAY, MAY 5, 6 P.M.

John M. Coetzee, winner of the 2003 Nobel Prize for Literature, will speak about his time in Austin and the social and political background of his career as a writer in South Africa in the 1970s. Coetzee (Ph.D., 1969), one of The University of Texas at Austin's most distinguished alumni, is an acclaimed novelist, academic, and literary critic. Said to be influenced by his own personal history of growing up in South Africa, Coetzee writes with strong anti-imperialist feelings. He has published 13 books, including The Life and Times of Michael K in 1983 and Disgrace in 1999. Both books were awarded the Booker Prize, making him the first author to be given the award twice. His novel, Waiting for the Barbarians, was adapted into an opera composed by Philip Glass. This program is hosted by the Graduate School, the Michener Center for Writers, and the Harry Ransom Center at The University of Texas at Austin.

The event is free and open to the public. Seating is limited, so please RSVP early to attend. On-site registration will also be available.

MORE DETAILS

LBJ Auditorium


Poetry on the Plaza: Cinco de Mayo READING WEDNESDAY, MAY 5, NOON

The Harry Ransom Center presents the Poetry on the Plaza event Cinco de Mayo on Wednesday, May 5, at noon.


Another Glorious Day with Kenneth Brown SCREENING THURSDAY, APRIL 29, 7 P.M.

Playwright Kenneth Brown, whose archive resides at the Ransom Center, introduces a screening of the documentary film Another Glorious Day on Thursday, April 29, at 7 p.m. at the Ransom Center. The film explores the history, context, and performances of the Living Theatre's European tour of his play, The Brig (1963). A question and answer session follows.

The film is centered around a 2008 revival of The Brig, the inflammatory 1963 play that exposed the harsh realities inside a U.S. Marine prison. This documentary by Karin Kaper and Dirk Szuszies puts former Marine Kenneth H. Brown's drama into historical perspective—and makes a case for its ongoing relevance—through powerful scenes from the recent production in Berlin and illuminating interviews with directors of the play past and present, revival cast members, and the playwright himself.

When Julian Beck and Judith Malina, the founders of New York's radical Living Theatre, brought The Brig to their stage in the early 1960s, many theater critics—not to mention the US Department of Defense—found it not just obnoxious but subversive. Rooted in the surrealist model of the Theater of Cruelty, Brown's claustrophobic vision of young, caged Marines being transformed into automatons—performing a kind of foot-stamping ballet at double-time as they're verbally and physically abused by their guards—outraged many and stirred others to antiwar action. More than four decades later, with Americans again on the battlefield, the play still strikes raw nerves.

Please be aware that the Ransom Center's Charles Nelson Prothro Theater has limited seating. Line forms upon arrival of the first person, with doors opening 30 minutes in advance.


Peter Carey READING TUESDAY, APRIL 27, 7 P.M.

Booker Prize-winning author of Oscar and Lucinda and True History of the Kelly Gang, Peter Carey reads from his new novel, Parrot and Olivier in America on Tuesday, April 27, at 7 p.m. at the Harry Ransom Center. A book signing follows.

Parrot and Olivier in America is an inventive reimagining of Alexis de Tocqueville's famous journey, evoking the Old World colliding with the New. Olivier is an aristocrat, one of an endangered species born in France just after the Revolution. Parrot, the son of an itinerant English printer and twice Olivier's age, always wanted to be an artist but has ended up a servant.

When Olivier sets sail for the New World—ostensibly to study its prisons, but in reality to avoid yet another revolution—Parrot is sent with him, as spy, protector, foe, and foil. As the narrative shifts between the perspectives of Parrot and Olivier, between their picaresque adventures apart and together—in love and politics, prisons and finance, homelands and brave new lands—an unlikely friendship begins to take hold. And with their story, Carey explores the adventure of American democracy in theory, in practice, and as an ongoing argument.

Seating is free, but limited.

Carey is the author of ten previous novels. His other honors include the Commonwealth Writers' Prize and the Miles Franklin Literary Award. Born in Australia, he has lived in New York City for 20 years.


Poetry on the Plaza: Water, Air, Earth, and Fire READING WEDNESDAY, APRIL 21, NOON

The Harry Ransom Center presents the Poetry on the Plaza event Water, Air, Earth, and Fire on Wednesday, April 21, at noon.

Readers celebrate water, air, earth, and fire, the four classical elements, in honor of Earth Day on April 22. Readers include James Loehlin, head of the Shakespeare at Winedale program and professor in the Department of English at The University of Texas at Austin; Robert Faires, Arts Editor of the Austin Chronicle; and Chris Plonsky, Women's Athletic Director at the University. Graduate student Todd Thompson performs a song inspired by Peter Matthiessen's novel Killing Mr. Watson.

Refreshments will be served at this free event.


Angella Nazarian READING TUESDAY, APRIL 20, 7 P.M.

Writer Angella M. Nazarian reads from Life as a Visitor, her account of fleeing Iran with her family and life as an immigrant caught between two cultures, on Tuesday, April 20, at 7 p.m. at the Harry Ransom Center. A book signing follows.

Forced to flee to the United States at age eleven after the violent Iranian Revolution of 1979, best-selling author Angella Nazarian talks about her journey from past to present, from the exotic to the familiar, and from a country's political struggle to her own inner struggle in search of home, family, and sense of belonging.

Life as a Visitor chronicles Nazarian's difficult and triumphant journey to blend East and West. Her book offers an intimate look at what life is like for an immigrant caught between two cultures.

Nazarian is a professor of psychology and facilitates adult personal development workshops. She is an avid traveler, photographer, and art enthusiast and has integrated these passions into her writing and her contributions to the Huffington Post and other publications.

Please be aware that the Ransom Center's Charles Nelson Prothro Theater has limited seating. Line forms upon arrival of the first person, with doors opening 30 minutes in advance.

Co-sponsored by the Schusterman Center for Jewish Studies at The University of Texas at Austin


Screening of Peter Matthiessen: No Boundaries FILM MONDAY, APRIL 12, 7 P.M.

The Harry Ransom Center screens Peter Matthiessen: No Boundaries, a documentary film about the National Book Award–winning writer and environmental activist, written and directed by Jeffrey Sewald, on Monday, April 12, at 7 p.m.

Matthiessen's archive resides at the Ransom Center.

In this intimate glimpse at celebrated writer, activist, and Buddhist priest Matthiessen (author of The Snow Leopard), Sewald explores the influences that have colored the author's life, work, and beliefs. Interviews with Matthiessen, book excerpts, and anecdotes from son Alex Mathiessen, novelist Jim Harrison, author Thomas McGuane, and others create a dynamic portrait of this writer. Glenn Close narrates.

Please be aware that the Ransom Center's Charles Nelson Prothro Theater has limited seating. Line forms upon arrival of the first person, with doors opening 30 minutes in advance.

57 minutes / Not Rated


Iain Sinclair: London Orbital READING THURSDAY, APRIL 8, 7 P.M.

British writer Iain Sinclair, whose archive resides at the Ransom Center, reads from London Orbital on Thursday, April 8, at 7 p.m. at the Harry Ransom Center. The reading will be followed by a conversation between Sinclair and author Michael Moorcock, audience questions, and a book signing.

London Orbital is Sinclair's "compulsively detouring account of walking and writing across one small patch of ground over forty years."

Walking around the "acoustic footprints" of the M25 orbital motorway, the ring road that encloses London, was Sinclair's method of discovering where the sprawling city gave up the ghost: and where the uncertain future was carrying us. Trends are auditioned in these suburban edgelands: off-highway business parks, golf courses, decommissioned Victorian lunatic asylums. Walking became a form of writing, a method for connecting with lost histories. Sinclair discusses this and other expeditions, with appropriate readings from a number of books.

Please be aware that the Ransom Center's Charles Nelson Prothro Theater has limited seating. Line forms upon arrival of the first person, with doors opening 30 minutes in advance.

Sinclair is the author of Downriver (winner of the James Tait Black Memorial Prize and the Encore Award); Landor's Tower; White Chappell; Scarlet Tracings; Lights Out for the Territory; Lud Heat; Rodinsky's Room (with Rachel Lichtenstein); Radon Daughters; London Orbital; and Dining on Stones. He is also the editor of London: City of Disappearances. He lives in Hackney, East London.


Poetry on the Plaza: Spring into Love READING WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7, NOON

The Harry Ransom Center presents the Poetry on the Plaza event Spring into Love on Wednesday, April 7, at noon.


Curator's Tour of Making Movies TOUR THURSDAY, MARCH 25, 7 P.M.

Steve Wilson, the Ransom Center's Associate Curator of Film, leads a free gallery tour of Making Movies on Thursday, March 25, at 7 p.m.

Featuring items from the Ransom Center's extensive film collections, Making Movies reveals the collaborative nature of the filmmaking process and focuses on how the artists involved—from writers to directors, actors to cinematographers—transform the written word into moving image.

Highlights include original scripts, storyboards, production photos, and call sheets, in addition to screenplays from The Third Man, North by Northwest, and Shakespeare in Love, and costumes from Gone With The Wind, An Affair to Remember, and Taxi Driver.

If you are unable to attend the curator's tour, free docent-led tours of Making Movies are offered Tuesdays at noon and Saturdays at 2 p.m. The exhibition runs through August 1.


"Lighting and Camerawork in the Films of David O. Selznick" LECTURE THURSDAY, MARCH 4, 7 P.M.

Patrick Keating, author of Hollywood Lighting from the Silent Era to Film Noir, discusses the history and evolution of lighting in Hollywood films, on Thursday, March 4, at 7 p.m. at the Harry Ransom Center.

Famous for his demanding approach to directors and stars, the producer David O. Selznick could be just as exacting when it came to cinematography, pushing his cinematographers to experiment with lighting, color, and camera movement. Drawing on archival sources, this lecture examines the process of collaboration behind the cinematography for several landmark films, including Gone With The Wind (1939) and Indiscretion of an American Wife (1953).

Please be aware that the Ransom Center's Charles Nelson Prothro Theater has limited seating. Line forms upon arrival of the first person, with doors opening 30 minutes in advance.

Keating is an assistant professor in the Department of Communication at Trinity University, where he teaches courses in film and media studies.

This program is presented in conjunction with the exhibition Making Movies, on display through August 1. Featuring items from the Ransom Center's extensive film collections, Making Movies reveals the collaborative nature of the filmmaking process and focuses on how the artists involved—from writers to directors, actors to cinematographers—transform the written word into moving image.

Highlights include original scripts, storyboards, production photos, and call sheets, in addition to screenplays from The Third Man, North by Northwest, and Shakespeare in Love, and costumes from Gone With The Wind, An Affair to Remember, and Taxi Driver.


Poetry on the Plaza: The Poetry of Africa READING WEDNESDAY, MARCH 3, NOON

The Harry Ransom Center presents the Poetry on the Plaza event The Poetry of Africa on Wednesday, March 3, at noon.


John Banville READING TUESDAY, MARCH 2, 7 P.M.

Booker Prize-winning author of The Sea, John Banville, reads from his new novel, The Infinities, on Tuesday, March 2, at 7 p.m. A book signing follows.

In Banville's novel, Adam Godley, a renowned theoretical mathematician, is dying. His family gathers at his bedside: his son, young Adam, struggling to maintain his marriage to a radiantly beautiful actress; his 19-year-old daughter, Petra, filled with voices and visions as she waits for the inevitable; their stepmother, Ursula, whose relations with the Godley children are strained at best. But the Godley family is not alone in their vigil. Around them hovers a family of mischievous immortals—among them Zeus, who has his eye on young Adam's wife; Pan, who has taken the doughy form of an old unwelcome acquaintance; and Hermes, the genial and omniscient narrator: "We too are petty and vindictive," he tells us, "just like you, when we are put to it."

Please be aware that the Ransom Center's Charles Nelson Prothro Theater has limited seating. Line forms upon arrival of the first person, with doors opening 30 minutes in advance.

Banville was born in Wexford, Ireland, in 1945. His first book, Long Lankin, was published in 1970. Among his other books are Nightspawn, Birchwood, The Newton Letter, Mefisto, and The Book of Evidence (which was short-listed for the 1989 Booker Prize). He has also received a literary award from the Lannan Foundation. He is the former literary editor of the Irish Times and lives in Dublin.


A Tribute to J. D. Salinger READING FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 7 P.M.

Local writers including Elizabeth Crane, Amelia Gray, ZZ Packer, and John Pipkin and members of The University of Texas at Austin community commemorate the life of J. D. Salinger with readings from his work and correspondence. The event will mark the opening of a small display of Salinger manuscripts, letters, and inscribed books from the Ransom Center's collections.

Co-sponsored by American Short Fiction


Bill Hobby LECTURE MONDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 7 P.M.

The Harry Ransom Center presents a lecture by former Lieutenant Governor Bill Hobby on Monday, February 22, at 7 p.m.

Hobby discusses the probable effects of the upcoming 23rd U.S. census. As a result of updated census numbers, Hobby predicts that Texas will likely gain four seats in Congress and four electoral votes in the next three presidential elections and be eligible for billions more of dollars in federal aid. Next year based on the census results, the Legislature will redraw 232 districts: 36 congressional, 31 state senatorial, 150 state house, and 15 State Board of Education.

Please be aware that the Ransom Center's Charles Nelson Prothro Theater has limited seating. Line forms upon arrival of the first person, and doors open 30 minutes in advance.


Music from the Collections: "Words and Music: Classical Music in Cinema" PERFORMANCE THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 7 P.M. JESSEN AUDITORIUM

In a Music from the Collections event, Michael Schneider explores the connection between music and movies, featuring live performances of music from West Side Story (1961), The Pianist (2002), Song of Love (1947) and other films in "Words and Music: Classical Music in Cinema." The program takes place Thursday, February 18, at 7 p.m. in Jessen Auditorium in Homer Rainey Hall.

Performers include pianist Nancy Garrett, Professor in the Butler School of Music at The University of Texas at Austin; Robert Freeman, former dean and current Susan Menefee Ragan Regents Professor in Fine Arts at the Butler School of Music; soprano Icy Simpson, graduate student in opera performance at the Butler School of Music; and pianist Michael Schneider, doctoral student in the Butler School of Music and Director of the San Angelo Piano Festival.

Please be aware Jessen Auditorium has limited seating. Line forms upon arrival of the first person, with doors opening 30 minutes in advance.

This program is in conjunction with the exhibition Making Movies. Featuring items from the Ransom Center's extensive film collections, Making Movies reveals the collaborative nature of the filmmaking process and focuses on how the artists involved—from writers to directors, actors to cinematographers—transform the written word into moving image.

Highlights include original scripts, storyboards, production photos, and call sheets, in addition to screenplays from The Third Man, North by Northwest, and Shakespeare in Love, and costumes from Gone With The Wind, An Affair to Remember, and Taxi Driver.


Curator's Tour of Making Movies TOUR TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 7 P.M.

Steve Wilson, the Ransom Center's Associate Curator of Film, leads a free gallery tour of Making Movies on Tuesday, February 16, at 7 p.m.

Featuring items from the Ransom Center's extensive film collections, Making Movies reveals the collaborative nature of the filmmaking process and focuses on how the artists involved—from writers to directors, actors to cinematographers—transform the written word into moving image.

Highlights include original scripts, storyboards, production photos, and call sheets, in addition to screenplays from The Third Man, North by Northwest, and Shakespeare in Love, and costumes from Gone With The Wind, An Affair to Remember, and Taxi Driver.

If you are unable to attend the curator's tour, free docent-led tours of Making Movies are offered Tuesdays at noon and Saturdays at 2 p.m. The exhibition runs through August 1.


Making Movies Red Carpet EventOPENING FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 6 P.M.

Join us for a red carpet premiere for the exhibition Making Movies. Free for members of the Harry Ransom Center; $20 ticket required for non-members.

MORE DETAILS


Poetry on the Plaza: A Poet Walks into a Movie READING WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 3, NOON

The Harry Ransom Center presents the Poetry on the Plaza event A Poet Walks into a Movie on Wednesday, February 3, at noon.

There have been movies based on poets and poems, and poets have confronted movies in their poems. This edition of Poetry on the Plaza explores the often uneasy but always engaging relation between poets and the silver screen.

Readers include Alison Macor, Ransom Center fellow and author of Chainsaws, Slackers, and Spy Kids: Thirty Years of Filmmaking in Austin, Texas, and Anne Rapp, screenwriter and former script supervisor.

Refreshments will be served at this free event.

Macor, an independent scholar and former film critic for The Austin Chronicle and the Austin American-Statesman, worked in the Ransom Center's Warren Skaaren collection last summer in preparation for her upcoming biography, In Batman's Shadow: The Life and Career of Screenwriter Warren Skaaren.

Rapp was a script supervisor in the film industry for 15 years and worked on more than 40 feature films, beginning with Tender Mercies in 1981 and ending with That Thing You Do in 1997. She began writing short stories, which led to a job writing for Robert Altman. Altman directed two of her screenplays, Cookie's Fortune and Dr. T and the Women. She is currently adapting a book about American nurses in the Philippines in World War II, and one of her original screenplays, Double Wide, has recently been optioned by Blue Collar Productions with Rapp as director.



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