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FALL 2012

Things to Come (1936) SCREENING THURSDAY, DECEMBER 13, 7 P.M.

In conjunction with the exhibition I Have Seen the Future: Norman Bel Geddes Design America, the Harry Ransom Center screens the Bel Geddes-influenced film Things to Come (1936) on Thursday, December 13, at 7 p.m.

Written by H. G. Wells and directed by William Cameron Menzies, the British science fiction film is a loose adaptation of Wells's 1933 novel, The Shape of Things to Come, and his 1931 non-fiction work, The Work, Wealth and Happiness of Mankind. With a plot that spans 100 years, Things to Come explores a decades-long second world war that results in plague and anarchy, followed by a rational state that rebuilds civilization and tries space travel.

The event is free, but donations are welcome. Seating is limited. Line forms upon arrival of the first patron, and doors open 30 minutes in advance.


Jim Crace and Anthony Giardina READING THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 7:30 P.M.

AVAYA AUDITORIUM IN THE ACES BUILDING

The Michener Center for Writers at The University of Texas at Austin hosts readings by writers and visiting professors Jim Crace and Anthony Giardina. Crace's archive resides at the Ransom Center.


The Fate of the Book PANEL DISCUSSION THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 7 P.M.

Novelist Paul La Farge; Bob Stein, founder of the Institute for the Future of the Book; and Daniel Raff, Associate Professor at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, discuss the ways technology has transformed the book. This event is part of the TILTS Symposia 2012–13: The Fate of the Book.


Curators' Tour of I Have Seen the Future: Norman Bel Geddes Designs America Tour THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 7 P.M.

Cathy Henderson, Associate Director for Exhibitions, and Helen Baer, Associate Curator of Performing Arts, lead a tour of the exhibition I Have Seen the Future: Norman Bel Geddes Designs America on Thursday, November 15, at 7 p.m. at the Harry Ransom Center.

View a video preview of the exhibition

Norman Bel Geddes (1893–1958) was an innovative stage and industrial designer, futurist, and urban planner who, more than any designer of his era, created and promoted a dynamic vision of the future—streamlined, technocratic, and optimistic. Bel Geddes popularized this vision through drawings, models, and photographs of spectacular vehicles, buildings, and products featured in his books Horizons and Magic Motorways. His most notable effort was his Futurama display for the General Motors "Highways and Horizons" exhibit at the 1939–1940 New York World's Fair, which adopted the motto "I Have Seen the Future." Futurama's giant model of a 1960 future American city gave Depression-era Americans genuine hope for a better future within their lifetimes.

The exhibition explores the career of this complex and influential man through more than 60 projects from the Ransom Center's Norman Bel Geddes collection. The exhibition brings together never-before-exhibited drawings, models, photographs, and films.

The event is free, but donations are welcome. Attendees at the event may enter to win a Bel Geddes-inspired package.


Curators' Welcome Reception and Open House for New Members MEMBER EVENT WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 7 P.M.

Enjoy a night of special access to the Ransom Center at this insiders' open house and reception for new members. Invitation-only; RSVP required.

Become a member today at hrc.utexas.edu/membership.


Members-only Building Tour MEMBER TOUR SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 11 A.M.

Cathy Henderson, Associate Director of Exhibitions, and James Stroud, Associate Director for Conservation and Building Management, lead an exclusive tour of the building's restricted areas, including collection storage and the cataloging, technology, and conservation departments. Open to Guild-level members and above; limited capacity; RSVP required.

Join, upgrade, or renew at hrc.utexas.edu/membership.


Nathan Lyons HARRY RANSOM LECTURE THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 7 P.M.

The Harry Ransom Center's Curator of Photography Jessica S. McDonald speaks with photographer, curator, and educator Nathan Lyons about his career and role in the expansion of American photography on Thursday, November 8, at 7 p.m.

As a curator, theorist, educator, artist, and advocate, Nathan Lyons has played a central role in the expansion of photography over the last five decades. After producing seminal exhibitions and publications as curator at George Eastman House in Rochester, New York, in the 1960s, he founded the Visual Studies Workshop, an independent arts organization where his innovative programs trained a new generation of photographers, critics, curators, and historians.

McDonald edited the anthology Nathan Lyons: Selected Essays, Lectures, and Interviews (UT Press, 2012), which provides the first comprehensive overview of Lyons's career as one of the most important voices in American photography. The book will be available for purchase and signing at the event.

The event is free and open to the public. Seating is limited. Members of the Harry Ransom Center receive complimentary parking and priority entry at this program. Doors open at 6:20 p.m. for members and at 6:30 p.m. for the general public. Members must present their membership cards for priority entrance; one seat per membership card. Members arriving after 6:30 p.m. will join the general queue. Complimentary parking for members is available at the University Co-op garage at 23rd and San Antonio streets.

The Harry Ransom Lectures honor former University of Texas Chancellor Harry Huntt Ransom and highlight the Ransom Center's vital role in the University's intellectual and cultural life. The program brings internationally renowned writers, artists, and scholars to Austin for public events and conversations with University students. The lectures are made possible by the generous support of the University Co-op.


Poetry on the Plaza: Politics and Presidents READING WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 7, NOON


"Visions of the Future" FLAIR SYMPOSIUM THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 1–SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 3

Please note: we are monitoring the weather conditions along the Atlantic coast, which may affect the travel of a number of symposium speakers. The symposium will proceed as planned with possible event substitutions.

"Visions of the Future" brings together historians, architects, industrial designers, and visionaries in the fields of science fiction, film, theater, and future studies to explore the ways the future has been imagined over time. Pre-payment and registration required.

Members of the Ransom Center receive a 20% discount on the $100 registration fee, which includes access to all symposium events. Please call 512-232-3669 for the discount code. Please note: the member discount cannot be applied to student registration.

For more information visit www.hrc.utexas.edu/flair.


Bruce Sterling launches 2012 Flair Symposium LECTURE THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 7:30 P.M.

JESSEN AUDITORIUM IN HOMER RAINEY HALL

Please note: we are monitoring the weather conditions along the Atlantic coast, which may affect the travel of a number of symposium speakers. The symposium will proceed as planned with possible event substitutions.

Author and futurist Bruce Sterling delivers the public keynote lecture of the Harry Ransom Center's Flair Symposium "Visions of the Future" on Thursday, November 1, at 7:30 p.m. at Jessen Auditorium in Homer Rainey Hall.

Sterling, whose archive resides at the Ransom Center, is an American science fiction author best known for his novels and his work on the Mirrorshades anthology, which helped define the cyberpunk genre.

The 2012 Flair Symposium "Visions of the Future" continues Friday, November 2, and Saturday, November 3. It brings together historians, architects, industrial designers, and visionaries in the fields of science fiction, film, theater, and future studies to explore the ways the future has been imagined over time. Payment and pre-registration for the symposium is required; however, the keynote event is free and open to the public.

Seating is limited. Line forms upon arrival of the first patron, and doors open 30 minutes in advance. Registrants for the symposium will have reserved seats at the event.

Event attendees will have the opportunity to enter a drawing to win a Bruce Sterling book and other items.


"Every Love Story is a Ghost Story: A Life of David Foster Wallace" DISCUSSION SATURDAY, OCTOBER 27–SUNDAY, OCTOBER 28

STATE CAPITOL

As part of the Texas Book Festival, D. T. Max, staff writer at The New Yorker and author of Every Love Story is a Ghost Story: A Life of David Foster Wallace, speaks with Megan Barnard, Assistant Director for Acquisitions and Administration at the Ransom Center. David Foster Wallace's papers reside at the Ransom Center.


Denis Johnson READING THURSDAY, OCTOBER 25, 7:30 P.M.

BLANTON AUDITORIUM IN THE EDGAR A. SMITH BUILDING

The Michener Center for Writers at The University of Texas at Austin hosts a reading by National Book Award-winner Denis Johnson, author of Jesus' Son and Tree of Smoke. Johnson's archive resides at the Ransom Center.


The Fate of the Book PANEL DISCUSSION THURSDAY, OCTOBER 25, 7 P.M.

Michael Witmore, director of the Folger Shakespeare Library; Kathleen Rooney, poet, writer, and founding editor of Rose Metal Press; and Nicolas Barker, editor of The Book Collector, discuss the way changing technologies are helping to preserve the book. This event is part of the TILTS Symposia 2012–13: The Fate of the Book.


Amon Carter Lecture celebrates Tom Lea Month AMON CARTER LECTURE WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 24, 7 P.M.

The Harry Ransom Center commemorates Tom Lea Month with an Amon Carter Lecture on West Texas artist, on Wednesday, October 24, at 7 p.m.

Kenneth Grant, Head of Exhibition Services at the Ransom Center, shares behind-the-scenes insights on the conservation of artist and writer Tom Lea's drawing in "Saving Sarah: The Conservation of Tom Lea's drawing for 'Sarah in the Summertime.'" Then, historian and collector J. P. Bryan discusses collaborations between El Paso artists Lea and José Cisneros and publisher Carl Hertzog in "Iron Sharpens Iron: The Unique Collaborations of Early El Paso Artists."

The Ransom Center holds the largest single collection of Lea's work.


Michael Chabon's Life and Work DISCUSSION WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 17, 7 P.M.

JESSEN AUDITORIUM IN HOMER RAINEY HALL

L.A. Times book critic David Ulin speaks with Pulitzer Prize–winning writer Michael Chabon about Chabon's life, work, and new novel, Telegraph Avenue, on Wednesday, October 17, at 7 p.m. in Jessen Auditorium in Homer Rainey Hall.

Michael Chabon is the bestselling author of The Mysteries of Pittsburgh, A Model World, Wonder Boys, Werewolves in Their Youth, The Final Solution, The Yiddish Policemen's Union, Maps and Legends, Gentlemen of the Road, and Summerland. His novel The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 2001.

The event is free, but donations are welcome. Seating is limited. Line forms upon arrival of the first patron, and doors open 30 minutes in advance. Attendees at the event will have an opportunity to enter a drawing for a signed Chabon book, as well as one of his favorite books.

A book signing follows with books available for sale from BookPeople. Co-sponsored by the Schusterman Center for Jewish Studies at The University of Texas at Austin.


Curators' Tour of I Have Seen the Future: Norman Bel Geddes Designs America Tour THURSDAY, OCTOBER 4, 7 P.M.

Cathy Henderson, Associate Director for Exhibitions, and Helen Baer, Associate Curator of Performing Arts, lead a tour of the exhibition I Have Seen the Future: Norman Bel Geddes Designs America on Thursday, October 4, at 7 p.m. at the Harry Ransom Center.

View a video preview of the exhibition

Norman Bel Geddes (1893–1958) was an innovative stage and industrial designer, futurist, and urban planner who, more than any designer of his era, created and promoted a dynamic vision of the future—streamlined, technocratic, and optimistic. Bel Geddes popularized this vision through drawings, models, and photographs of spectacular vehicles, buildings, and products featured in his books Horizons and Magic Motorways. His most notable effort was his Futurama display for the General Motors "Highways and Horizons" exhibit at the 1939–1940 New York World's Fair, which adopted the motto "I Have Seen the Future." Futurama's giant model of a 1960 future American city gave Depression-era Americans genuine hope for a better future within their lifetimes.

The exhibition explores the career of this complex and influential man through more than 60 projects from the Ransom Center's Norman Bel Geddes collection. The exhibition brings together never-before-exhibited drawings, models, photographs, and films.

The event is free, but donations are welcome. Attendees at the event may enter to win a Bel Geddes-inspired package.


Poetry on the Plaza: Actors from the London Stage READING WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 3, NOON

The Harry Ransom Center presents the Poetry on the Plaza event "The Poetry of Jacques Prévert" with actor Michael Palmer on Wednesday, October 3, at noon.

Palmer is touring with Actors from the London Stage (AFTLS) and plays Shylock in their current production of The Merchant of Venice. He has previously toured the United States with AFTLS in Twelfth Night playing Malvolio and Sir Andrew Aguecheek.

Pick up a free poster and bookmark with the 2012–2013 Poetry on the Plaza schedule at the visitor desk in the Ransom Center lobby.


Geoff Dyer HARRY RANSOM LECTURE MONDAY, OCTOBER 1, 7 P.M.

Novelist and essayist Geoff Dyer, author of The Ongoing Moment and The Missing of the Somme, presents "Close Enough," about the changes in war writing and war photography over time on Monday, October 1, at 7 p.m. at the Harry Ransom Center.

Dyer is the author of four novels, Paris Trance, The Search, The Colour of Memory, and most recently, Jeff in Venice, Death in Varanasi; two collections of essays, Anglo-English Attitudes and Working the Room; and five genre-defying titles, But Beautiful, The Missing of the Somme, Out of Sheer Rage, Yoga For People Who Can't Be Bothered To Do It, and The Ongoing Moment.

Dyer's collection of essays from the last 20 years, Otherwise Known as the Human Condition, won the National Book Critic's Circle Award for Criticism. His most recent book Zona (2012) is about Andrei Tarkovsky's film Stalker (1979).

The event is free and open to the public. Seating is limited. Members of the Harry Ransom Center receive complimentary parking and priority entry at this program. Doors open at 6:20 p.m. for members and at 6:30 p.m. for the general public. Members must present their membership cards for priority entrance; one seat per membership card. Members arriving after 6:30 p.m. will join the general queue. Complimentary parking for members is available at the University Co-op garage at 23rd and San Antonio streets.

The Harry Ransom Lectures honor former University of Texas Chancellor Harry Huntt Ransom and highlight the Ransom Center's vital role in the University's intellectual and cultural life. The program brings internationally renowned writers, artists, and scholars to Austin for public events and conversations with University students. The lectures are made possible by the generous support of the University Co-op.

Mark your calendar for the next Harry Ransom Lecture featuring photographer Nathan Lyons on Thursday, November 8.


Central Market Cooking Class COOKING CLASS SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 11 A.M.

Central Market, 4001 North Lamar

Enjoy brunch and cooking demonstrations by Central Market Cooking School Chef Louis Ortiz as he creates dishes inspired by the exhibition I Have Seen the Future: Norman Bel Geddes Designs America and the 1939 World's Fair. Ortiz will lead a lively discussion of Depression-era food innovations, such as the introduction of ethnic dishes and convenience foods into the mainstream, and Geddes's influence on the modern, electric kitchen. The menu features dishes from the era and includes fried chicken with a Lay's potato chip crust and lemon butter sauce; buttered carrots and mashed potatoes; spaghetti and meatballs; sweet and sour pork; Royal Fruit gelatin salad; and Toll House cookies. Pre-payment and registration required.

The cost of the class is $45. Ransom Center members receive 10% discount off of registration; members, please call 512-232-3669 for the discount code. We recommend that you register early, as the class size is limited. The class takes place at the Central Market Cooking School, located at 4001 North Lamar Boulevard.


Nicholson Baker LECTURE THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 5:30 P.M.

BLANTON AUDITORIUM IN THE EDGAR A. SMITH BUILDING

Nicholson Baker, author of The Size of Thoughts and Double Fold, opens the Texas Institute for Literary and Textual Studies (TILTS) Symposia 2012–13: The Fate of the Book.


Austin Museum Day TOUR SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, NOON–5 P.M.

Visit the Ransom Center's exhibitions on Austin Museum Day. Docent-led tours begin at noon, 2 p.m., and 4 p.m.


"FutureLand" OPENING FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 7 P.M.

Join us for "FutureLand," a retro-futuristic celebration for the fall exhibition I Have Seen the Future: Norman Bel Geddes Designs America.

Get a first look at the exhibition, enter our drawing for a Geddes-inspired prize package, bring your vision of the future to life with the Toy Joy's interactive "City of the Future," or relax in the Design Within Reach outdoor lounge while enjoying refreshments from Austin Wine Merchant, Dripping Springs Vodka, and Coolhaus.

Become a member now to receive complimentary admission and valet parking at this event. If you are not yet a member, tickets are available for $20 (valet parking included).

Advance ticket sales have ended. Tickets will be available at the door, or you may call 512-232-3669 to order tickets over the phone.

LEARN MORE


Poetry on the Plaza: The American Folk Tradition READING WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, NOON


SPRING 2012

Solomon and Sheba (1959) BIBLICAL FILM SERIES THURSDAY, JULY 26, 7 P.M.

The Biblical Film Series concludes at the Harry Ransom Center with King Vidor's Solomon and Sheba (1959), starring Yul Brynner and Gina Lollobrigida, on Thursday, July 26, at 7 p.m.

In this non-canonical retelling of the Biblical account, King David names his younger son Solomon (Brynner) successor ahead of his older son Adonijah (George Sanders). Solomon falls in love with the Queen of Sheba (Lollobrigida), who, unbeknownst to him, has allied herself with the Pharaoh of Egypt, aims to divide the Twelve Tribes of Israel, and uses the disaffected Adonijah in her plans. The film runs 139 minutes.

This program is in conjunction with the exhibition The King James Bible: Its History and Influence, on display through July 29 (closing this Sunday). Four hundred years after its first printing, the King James translation of the Bible remains a vital work whose language permeates contemporary music, literature, and everyday speech. The exhibition tells the little-known story of one of the most widely read and printed books in the history of the English language.

The event is free, but donations are welcome. Seating is limited. Line forms upon arrival of the first patron, and doors open 30 minutes in advance.


Samson and Delilah (1949) BIBLICAL FILM SERIES THURSDAY, JULY 12, 7 P.M.

The Biblical Film Series continues at the Harry Ransom Center with Cecil B. DeMille's Samson and Delilah (1949), starring Hedy Lamarr and Victor Mature, on Thursday, July 12, at 7 p.m.

Based on the Biblical account found in the Book of Judges, this film tells the story of Samson (Mature), the strongest man in the tribe of Dan. After a confrontation takes the life of Samson's betrothed, Semadar (Angela Lansbury), her sister Delilah (Lamarr) vows to avenge her by seducing Samson, learning the secret of his strength, and betraying him to the Philistines. The film runs 131 minutes.

This program is in conjunction with the exhibition The King James Bible: Its History and Influence, on display through July 29 (closing this Sunday). Four hundred years after its first printing, the King James translation of the Bible remains a vital work whose language permeates contemporary music, literature, and everyday speech. The exhibition tells the little-known story of one of the most widely read and printed books in the history of the English language.

The event is free, but donations are welcome. Seating is limited. Line forms upon arrival of the first patron, and doors open 30 minutes in advance.

Mark your calendars for the final film in the series: Solomon and Sheba (1959) on July 26.


The Ten Commandments (1956) BIBLICAL FILM SERIES THURSDAY, JUNE 21, 6 P.M.

The Biblical Film Series continues at the Harry Ransom Center with Cecil B. DeMille's epic The Ten Commandments (1956), starring Charlton Heston, on Thursday, June 21, at 6 p.m. Please note the early start time due to the film's 220-minute length.

The film tells the story of the Egyptian prince Moses (Heston), who learns of his true heritage as a Hebrew and his divine mission as the deliverer of his people from bondage under his adoptive brother Pharaoh Ramses II (Yul Brynner).

This program is in conjunction with the exhibition The King James Bible: Its History and Influence, on display through July 29 (closing this Sunday). Four hundred years after its first printing, the King James translation of the Bible remains a vital work whose language permeates contemporary music, literature, and everyday speech. The exhibition tells the little-known story of one of the most widely read and printed books in the history of the English language.

The event is free and open to the public. Seating is limited. Line forms upon arrival of the first patron, and doors open 30 minutes in advance.

Mark your calendars for the other films in the series: Samson and Delilah (1949) on July 12 and Solomon and Sheba (1959) on July 26.


The Ten Commandments (1923) BIBLICAL FILM SERIES THURSDAY, JUNE 7, 7 P.M.

The Harry Ransom Center kicks off the Biblical Film Series with Cecil B. DeMille's first film version of The Ten Commandments (1923) on Thursday, June 7, at 7 p.m.

The first part of the film tells the biblical story of Moses (Theodore Roberts) leading the Hebrew people from Egypt to the Promised Land. The second part, a moral parable set the 1920s, tells of two brothers, rivals for the love of Mary (Leatrice Joy), who come into conflict when John (Richard Dix) discovers Dan (Rod La Rocque) used shoddy materials to construct a cathedral. This silent film, which runs 136 minutes, depicts both the story of the commandments and their application to contemporary 1920s society.

This program is in conjunction with the exhibition The King James Bible: Its History and Influence, on display through July 29 (closing this Sunday). Four hundred years after its first printing, the King James translation of the Bible remains a vital work whose language permeates contemporary music, literature, and everyday speech. The exhibition tells the little-known story of one of the most widely read and printed books in the history of the English language.

The event is free, but donations are welcome. Seating is limited. Line forms upon arrival of the first patron, and doors open 30 minutes in advance.

Mark your calendars for the other films in the series: The Ten Commandments (1956) on June 21, Samson and Delilah (1949) on July 12, and Solomon and Sheba (1959) on July 26.


Curators' Tour of The King James Bible: Its History and Influence CURATOR TOUR THURSDAY, MAY 3, 7 P.M.

Co-curators Cathy Henderson, Associate Director for Exhibitions, and Ryan Hildebrand, Book Cataloging Department Head, lead a tour of The King James Bible: Its History and Influence on Thursday, May 3, at 7 p.m. at the Harry Ransom Center.

Four hundred years after its first printing, the King James translation of the Bible remains a vital work whose language permeates contemporary music, literature, and everyday speech. The exhibition tells the little-known story of one of the most widely read and printed books in the history of the English language.

The event is free and open to the public.


Poetry on the Plaza: Singers and Songwriters READING WEDNESDAY, MAY 2, NOON

The Harry Ransom Center presents the Poetry on the Plaza event Poetry of the King James Bible on Wednesday, April 4, at noon.

Readers include exhibition co-curator Danielle Brune Sigler, University of Texas at Austin Assistant Professor of English Coleman Hutchison, Steve Bishop of Episcopal Theological Seminary of the Southwest, and Ron Smith of St. David's Episcopal Church.

This program is held in conjunction with the exhibition The King James Bible: Its History and Influence, on display through July 29. Four hundred years after its first printing, the King James translation of the Bible remains a vital work whose language permeates contemporary music, literature, and everyday speech. The exhibition tells the little-known story of one of the most widely read and printed books in the history of the English language.

Refreshments will be served at this free event.

Mark your calendar for the next Poetry on the Plaza event, Singers and Songwriters, on Wednesday, May 2.


"Manifold Greatness: The Making of the King James Bible" LECTURE THURSDAY, APRIL 26, 7 P.M.

Helen Moore, editor of Manifold Greatness: The Making of the King James Bible and Fellow and Tutor in English at Corpus Christi College, University of Oxford, speaks about the history of the King James translation on Thursday, April 26, at 7 p.m. at the Harry Ransom Center.

Watch a recording of this program

Moore was lead curator of Manifold Greatness: Oxford and the Making of the King James Bible, the exhibition held at the Bodleian Library at the University of Oxford in 2011 in celebration of the 400th anniversary of the translation of the King James Bible. Her illustrated talk addresses the role played by Oxford in the translation of the King James Bible, the methods used by the translators, and some of the items displayed at the Oxford exhibition, which welcomed a record-breaking 58,000 visitors.

With Julian Reid, Moore edited Manifold Greatness: The Making of the King James Bible, the book that accompanied its associated exhibition at the Folger Shakespeare Library and the Ransom Center.

A reception follows this lecture. This event is co-sponsored by Corpus Christi College, University of Oxford and The Wall Street Journal.

The event is free and open to the public. Seating is limited. Line forms upon arrival of the first patron, and doors open 30 minutes in advance.


Behind-the-Scenes Tour and Reception MEMBER EVENT WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 7 P.M.

Co-curators Cathy Henderson, Ryan Hildebrand, Richard Oram, and Danielle Brune Sigler give behind-the-scenes insights into The King James Bible: Its History and Influence. A reception follows. Open to Alliance level members and above; limited capacity; RSVP required. Join, upgrade, or renew at hrc.utexas.edu/memevents.


An Evening with Tom Smith HARRY RANSOM LECTURE THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 7 P.M.

Studio 6A, Communication Center Building B

Tom Smith, filmmaker and special effects pioneer, discusses his work on films including Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981), E.T. (1982), Star Trek: The Wrath of Khan (1982), and Return of the Jedi (1983). The event takes place Thursday, April 19, at 7 p.m. in KLRU's Studio 6A in the Communication Center Building B at The University of Texas at Austin.

As head of George Lucas's visual effects facility, Industrial Light & Magic, Smith oversaw the visual effects for such films as Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981), E.T.: The Extraterrestrial (1982), Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan (1982), Star Trek III: The Search for Spock (1984), Poltergeist (1982), and Return of the Jedi (1983). After leaving Lucasfilm, Smith produced films and visual effects for Disney, Jim Henson Productions, and Ted Turner. Smith is also the author of Industrial Light & Magic: The Art of Special Effects (1987).

The event is free and open to the public. Seating is limited. Members of the Harry Ransom Center receive complimentary parking and priority entry at this program. Doors open at 6:20 p.m. for members and at 6:30 p.m. for the general public. Members must present their membership cards for priority entrance; one seat per membership card. Members arriving after 6:30 p.m. will join the general queue. Complimentary parking for members is available at the University Co-op garage at 23rd and San Antonio streets.

The Harry Ransom Lectures honor former University of Texas Chancellor Harry Huntt Ransom and highlight the Ransom Center's vital role in the University's intellectual and cultural life. The program brings internationally renowned writers, artists, and scholars to Austin for public events and conversations with University students. The lectures are made possible by the generous support of the University Co-op.


Austin's Cultural Campus Concert Crawl TOUR SATURDAY, APRIL 14, 2-4 P.M.

Join us for an afternoon of music with the Austin's Cultural Campus Concert Crawl, a chamber music outreach project featuring performers from the Butler School of Music.

Enjoy performances of Beethoven's "Trio op. 11, III – Theme and Variations" and Albright's "Pit Band" at the Ransom Center. Performances will repeat every half hour and take place among the window etchings of the north atrium. Other participating venues from Austin's Cultural Campus include The Blanton Museum of Art, the Visual Arts Center, and the Texas Memorial Museum.


Bike Tour of Austin's Cultural Campus TOUR SATURDAY, APRIL 14, 1 P.M.

Meet at Mellow Johnny's Bike Shop (400 Nueces)

Explore art, history, the humanities, and science while enjoying a casual bike ride!

Co-hosted by Mellow Johnny's Bike Shop and the Austin Cycling Association, this no-drop, co-ed group ride is perfect for cyclists of all levels and riding abilities. Total distance is about 6 miles.

On this route, we'll visit museums that are part of Austin's Cultural Campus: the Blanton Museum of Art, the Ransom Center, the Texas Memorial Museum, and the Visual Arts Center. Docents will briefly share museum highlights, and you will enjoy musical performances from the University's Butler School of Music's Chamber Music Outreach Project at each stop.

Special information: Ride size is limited. Helmets and signed waiver are required. Ride may be cancelled in the event of inclement weather; please check mellowjohnnys.com for updated information.


Director's Welcome Reception and Open House for New Members MEMBER EVENT WEDNESDAY, APRIL 11, 6 P.M.

Enjoy a night of special access to the Ransom Center at this insiders' open house and reception for new members. Invitation-only; RSVP required. Become a member today at hrc.utexas.edu/memevents.


David Foster Wallace Symposium SYMPOSIUM FRIDAY, APRIL 6, 9 A.M.–5 P.M.

Program for The David Foster Wallace Symposium (PDF)

Writers, editors, and scholars including Colin Harrison, D. T. Max, and Seth Colter Walls discuss David Foster Wallace's life, work, and archive. Limited capacity. Pre-registration and payment required.

The Twitter hashtag for The David Foster Wallace Symposium is:   #dfwsymp

MORE DETAILS


"Everything and More: A Conversation About David Foster Wallace" HARRY RANSOM LECTURE THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 7 P.M.

JESSEN AUDITORIUM IN HOMER RAINEY HALL

The Harry Ransom Center kicks off The David Foster Wallace Symposium with a public event, "Everything and More: A Conversation About David Foster Wallace." Literary agent Bonnie Nadell and Little, Brown editor Michael Pietsch speak with Los Angeles Times book critic David Ulin about their work with David Foster Wallace. This Harry Ransom Lecture takes place Thursday, April 5, at 7 p.m. in Jessen Auditorium in Homer Rainey Hall.

The Twitter hashtag for The David Foster Wallace Symposium is:   #dfwsymp

Nadell became Wallace's agent in 1985 and has represented all of his books since then. Pietsch, Wallace's editor at Little, Brown and Company, compiled and edited Wallace's unfinished novel, The Pale King, which was posthumously published in 2011.

*Registrants to the David Foster Wallace Symposium receive reserved seats. Members of the Harry Ransom Center receive complimentary parking and priority entry. Doors open at 6:20 p.m. for members and at 6:30 p.m. for the general public. Members must present their membership cards for priority entry; one seat per membership card. Members arriving after 6:30 will join the general queue. Complimentary parking for members is available at the University Co-op garage at 23rd and San Antonio streets.

The Harry Ransom Lectures honor former University of Texas Chancellor Harry Huntt Ransom and highlight the Ransom Center's vital role in the University's intellectual and cultural life. The program brings internationally renowned writers, artists, and scholars to Austin for public events and conversations with University students. The lectures are made possible by the generous support of the University Co-op.


Poetry on the Plaza: Poetry of the King James Bible READING WEDNESDAY, APRIL 4, NOON

The Harry Ransom Center presents the Poetry on the Plaza event Poetry of the King James Bible on Wednesday, April 4, at noon.

Readers include exhibition co-curator Danielle Brune Sigler, University of Texas at Austin Assistant Professor of English Coleman Hutchison, Steve Bishop of Episcopal Theological Seminary of the Southwest, and Ron Smith of St. David's Episcopal Church.

This program is held in conjunction with the exhibition The King James Bible: Its History and Influence, on display through July 29. Four hundred years after its first printing, the King James translation of the Bible remains a vital work whose language permeates contemporary music, literature, and everyday speech. The exhibition tells the little-known story of one of the most widely read and printed books in the history of the English language.

Refreshments will be served at this free event.

Mark your calendar for the next Poetry on the Plaza event, Singers and Songwriters, on Wednesday, May 2.


Curators' Tour of The King James Bible: Its History and Influence TOUR THURSDAY, MARCH 29, 7 P.M.

Co-curators Richard Oram, Associate Director and Hobby Foundation Librarian, and Danielle Brune Sigler, Assistant Director and Curator for Academic Programs, lead a tour of The King James Bible: Its History and Influence on Thursday, March 29, at 7 p.m. at the Harry Ransom Center.

Four hundred years after its first printing, the King James translation of the Bible remains a vital work whose language permeates contemporary music, literature, and everyday speech. The exhibition tells the little-known story of one of the most widely read and printed books in the history of the English language.

The event is free and open to the public.


Curator's Choice: Recent Film Acquisitions with Steve Wilson MEMBER EVENT WEDNESDAY, MARCH 28, 6 P.M.

Curator of Film Steve Wilson offers a behind-the-scenes look at recent film acquisitions, including the archive of Nicholas Ray, director of Rebel Without a Cause (1955). A reception follows. Open to Guild level members and above; limited capacity; RSVP required. Join, upgrade, or renew at hrc.utexas.edu/memevents.


"Unravelling Shakespeare's Life" PFORZHEIMER LECTURE THURSDAY, MARCH 22, 7 P.M.

For the 2012 Pforzheimer Lecture James Shapiro, Columbia University professor and author of Contested Will: Who Wrote Shakespeare and 1599: A Year in the Life of William Shakespeare, presents "Unravelling Shakespeare's Life" on Thursday, March 22, at 7 p.m. at the Harry Ransom Center.

Shapiro's talk unravels Shakespeare's "life" as currently written and explores a number of important questions. Why have his biographers drifted toward fiction? To what extent have biographical approaches premised on reading early modern writers' lives through their works distorted Shakespeare's accomplishments? And what alternatives are there?

The Carl H. and Lily Pforzheimer Lecture at the Ransom Center is part of an annual lecture series featuring a prominent authority on bibliography, book arts, libraries, and related topics.

The event is free and open to the public. Seating is limited. Line forms upon arrival of the first patron, and doors open 30 minutes in advance.

This event is co-sponsored by the Center for European Studies and the Institute for Historical Studies at The University of Texas at Austin.

Ransom Center members at the Guild level and above have the opportunity to order an autographed copy of 1599: A Year in the Life of William Shakespeare by James Shapiro. To take advantage of this exclusive member benefit, please contact membership@hrc.utexas.edu or 512-232-3669 by March 6, 2012.


"The Question of Eloquence in the King James Version" LECTURE THURSDAY, MARCH 8, 7 P.M.

JESSEN AUDITORIUM IN HOMER RAINEY HALL

Robert Alter, Hebrew scholar, translator, and critic, presents "The Question of Eloquence in the King James Version" on Thursday, March 8, at 7 p.m. in Jessen Auditorium in Homer Rainey Hall. This program is presented by the Harry Ransom Center and the Schusterman Center for Jewish Studies at The University of Texas at Austin.

The Kings James Version is famous for its eloquence, and there is much in the translation that justifies that label. But in his talk, Alter will consider the ways in which this eloquence might or might not be akin to the stylistic force of the original, whether there are notable differences between this English rendering of poetry and prose, and whether there may be lapses in the eloquence.

This program is held in conjunction with the Ransom Center's exhibition The King James Bible: Its History and Influence, on display through July 29. Four hundred years after its first printing, the King James translation of the Bible remains a vital work whose language permeates contemporary music, literature, and everyday speech. The exhibition tells the little-known story of one of the most widely read and printed books in the history of the English language.

The event is free and open to the public. Seating is limited. Line forms upon arrival of the first patron, and doors open 30 minutes in advance.


"Kings & Creators" OPENING FRIDAY, MARCH 2, 6 P.M.

Eat, drink, and be merry (Luke 12:19) at this opening reception for the exhibition The King James Bible: Its History and Influence.

Guests will enjoy a first look at the exhibition, light hors d'oeuvres, a royal photo booth, music, and screenings in the theater curated by filmmaker Tommy Swenson.

Become a member now to receive your complimentary ticket and valet parking at this event. If you are not yet a member, you may purchase tickets to the opening for $20 at the door.

LEARN MORE


Poetry on the Plaza: Translation READING WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 22, NOON

Poetry on the Plaza: Translation

Co-sponsored by the Texas Institute for Literary and Textual Studies (TILTS).


Central Market Cooking Class COOKING CLASS FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 6:30 P.M.

Central Market, 4001 North Lamar

Enjoy dinner and cooking demonstrations by Central Market Cooking School Chef Louis Ortiz as he recreates dishes from the era of Shakespeare and the exhibition The King James Bible: Its History and Influence. Pre-payment and registration required at centralmarket.com. Ransom Center members receive a discount.


Poetry on the Plaza: Love READING WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, NOON

Poetry on the Plaza: Love



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