Harry Ransom CenterThe University of Texas at Austin

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Southeast Windows

From the Outside In: A Visitor's Guide to the Windows

Introduction

SOUTH | SOUTHEAST | NORTHEAST | NORTH









Decoration from Harmonice Mundi, Johannes Kepler, 1619

Letter from Gutenberg Bible, ca. 1455

Engraving from Schreibkunst, Anton Neudorfer, 1601

Portrait of Charles Dickens, J. C. Armytage, ca. 1868

Drawing, Edward Gorey, ca. 1948–52

Woodcut showing streetcar named "Desire," mid-20th century

Typescript of Women in Love, D. H. Lawrence, ca. 1919

The New York Yankees As Seen in San Antonio, E. O. Goldbeck, 1922

Botanical sketch, John Ruskin, 1861–62

Illustration for Lewis Carroll's "Hiawatha's Photographing," Arthur B. Frost, 1883

The image etched into the Harry Ransom Center windows of a wooden camera with a photographer crouching behind, hand outstretched, is an illustration by Arthur B. Frost for the poem "Hiawatha's Photographing" by Lewis Carroll. The poem parodies Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's Song of Hiawatha (1855), an epic ballad that became popular despite having an awkward meter that was often mocked.   Read more

Queen Victoria on Her Diamond Jubilee, Gunn and Stewart, 1897

Architectural drawing from La perspective, Hans Vredeman de Vries, 1639

First photograph, View from the Window at Le Gras (Retouched), Joseph Nicéphore Niépce, ca. 1826

One of the most renowned items in the Ransom Center's collections is the first recorded photograph, which has been faithfully reproduced on the Center's south atrium window. A French inventor named Joseph Nicéphore Niépce took this first photograph from the window of his studio in France in the early 1820s, and due to a fortunate series of events, the photograph has found itself on The University of Texas at Austin campus.   Read more

Gernsheim Collection, Harry Ransom Center.

Portrait of Edith Wharton, Kate Rogers Nowell, 1908

Letter by Jean Cocteau to Valentine Hugo with sketch of Stravinsky and Nijinsky, 1922

Transept of the Crystal Palace, Benjamin Brecknell Turner, 1852

This image captures the dramatic scale of the Crystal Palace, built to house the Great Exhibition of 1851, the first international world’s fair. It was the largest glass building at the time, covering 990,000 square feet of Hyde Park in the middle of London, and so tall that it could enclose whole elm trees. The photograph was taken at the end of the Exhibition, before the Palace was dismantled and rebuilt in the suburb Sydenham, south of the city, as an even grander permanent exhibition space.
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Decoration from Harmonice Mundi, Johannes Kepler, 1619

Letter from Dora Carrington to Noel Carrington, 1921

Borzoi device for Alfred A. Knopf, Inc., W. A. Dwiggins, 1937

Henri-Pierre Roché, unidentified photographer, 1957

Portrait of James Joyce, Wyndham Lewis, 1920

The windows of the Harry Ransom Center show two drawings of James Joyce, one by Desmond Harmsworth and one by Wyndham Lewis, depicting very different sides of the famous writer. The Lewis drawing, dated 1920, shows a portrait of Joyce from the outside: head down, identifiable by the thick eyeglasses and small beard. Lewis was one of Joyce's Modernist contemporaries—a novelist, experimental artist, and founder of the abstract art movement Vorticism. He was also a well-known curmudgeon and critic, and his sketch hints at the distance from which he approached his fellow artist. Harmsworth, in contrast, was one of Joyce's publishers and enjoyed long evenings talking and drinking with the writer. His drawing expresses more of Joyce's personal character.   Read more

A Tewa Girl, Edward S. Curtis, 1921

Illuminated letter from Gutenberg Bible, ca. 1455

Dolphin and Anchor device of Aldine Press, ca. 1490s

Facsimile of Photogenic Drawing, G. Francis, 1839

Costume design, Gordon Conway, 1920s

Sketch of King Louis-Philippe, William Makepeace Thackeray, 1830s

Horse in Motion, Eadweard Muybridge, ca. 1886

It may come as a surprise in the twenty-first century to discover that in the 1880s, details of how objects move were unknown. The human eye, unaided, cannot resolve the details of fast motion. Eadweard Muybridge and his experiments with motion photography, such as this series of pictures of a horse's gait helped solve this mystery.
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Photography collection, Harry Ransom Center.

Migrant Mother, Dorothea Lange, 1936

This powerful portrait depicts the weariness of a hard existence in poverty. Florence Owens, the migrant mother of the title, crouches in the foreground flanked by two of her children, their faces hidden. One's attention is directed to her eyes, which seem not to be looking at the camera but to be directed outward, perhaps contemplating a very uncertain future with little hope.   Read more

Gernsheim collection, Harry Ransom Center.

Illustration from Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, John Tenniel, 1865

"Curiouser and curiouser!" is what Alice cries when she suddenly stretches to more than nine feet tall, "like the largest telescope that ever was," in Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. In the drawing, we see Alice's large, startled eyes and open mouth expressing her surprise at her predicament.   Read more

Illustration from Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, John Tenniel, 1865

"Curiouser and curiouser!" is what Alice cries when she suddenly stretches to more than nine feet tall, "like the largest telescope that ever was," in Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. In the drawing, we see Alice's large, startled eyes and open mouth expressing her surprise at her predicament.   Read more

Model of Motorcar No. 9, Norman Bel Geddes, ca. 1932
Image courtesy of the Edith Lutyens and Norman Bel Geddes Foundation.

This streamlined car is the product of designer Norman Bel Geddes, who gained fame during the 1920s, '30s, and '40s for a broad range of designs. He got his start in New York designing theatrical sets in which he emphasized the use of lighting to set mood as well as provide illumination. He also designed film sets in Hollywood, including some for director Cecil B. DeMille.   Read more

Portraits of D. H. Lawrence, Knud Merrild, ca. 1922–23

Portrait of Marianne Moore, Robert Stewart Sherriff, 1960s