Harry Ransom CenterThe University of Texas at Austin

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News Release — August 15, 2012

Foundations of Modern Cartography
Now Visible Online and in Detail

Map. Click to enlarge.

Joan Blaeu's world map "Nova Totius Terrarum Orbis Tabula," 1648. The Ransom Center's copy, one of only two known to exist and the only colored copy, survives complete with an accompanying text. Photo by Pete Smith.


Map. Click to enlarge.

A manuscript map of Virginia that was produced in the earliest period of English settlement in America (ca. 1610). The map's written legends provide evidence of the attempts of the Virginia Company and the settlers to deal with the Native American tribes. The map is among the earliest of Virginia that survive; only three others from the period of the settlement are known.


Globe. Click to enlarge.

Coronelli celestial globe, ca. 1688.
Photo by Pete Smith.

AUSTIN, Texas—The Harry Ransom Center, a humanities research library and museum at The University of Texas at Austin, has introduced an online database for its entire Kraus map collection.

The 36–map collection, acquired in 1969 by Harry Ransom from the New York antiquarian dealer Hans P. Kraus, features a wide range of individual maps of Europe and America, atlases, a rare set of large terrestrial and celestial globes (ca. 1688) produced by the Italian master Vincenzo Coronelli and a group of manuscript letters by Abraham Ortelius.

"Visitors can see the remarkable foundations of modern cartography in this digital collection," said Richard Oram, the Ransom Center's associate director and Hobby Foundation Librarian. "From a medieval map that shows the world divided into three parts split by the Mediterranean Sea to an early portolan chart of the coast of Africa and a rare 1541 Mercator globe, it's all accessible from any computer desktop with an Internet connection."

Because of size and conservation considerations—some of the maps are as large as 6 by 9 feet—some of these maps have only been seen by a handful of visitors. This digital collection makes it possible for a larger public to examine the collection via the Ransom Center's website. The maps are all zoom-able, and users can view detailed close-ups of images.

Among the Kraus collection treasures are the maps, atlases and globes produced in the Low Countries during the 16th and 17th centuries by the accomplished cartographers Willem Blaeu (and sons), Gerard Mercator and Abraham Ortelius.

The single most important of these works is Joan Blaeu's enormous world map "Nova Totius Terrarum Orbis Tabula," completed in 1648. The Ransom Center's copy, one of only two known to exist and the only colored copy, survives complete with an accompanying text.

The collection also contains a manuscript map of Virginia that was produced in the earliest period of English settlement in America (ca. 1610). The map's written legends provide evidence of the attempts of the Virginia Company and the settlers to deal with the Native American tribes. The map is among the earliest of Virginia that survive; only three others from the period of the settlement are known.

Other Kraus cartographic treasures include a page from the "Etymologiae. Isidori Iunioris Hispalensis Episcopis Epistola" (1472), which was especially notable for including the small T-shaped map on leaf 181 recto, the first map of the world printed anywhere and a set of terrestrial and celestial globes produced ca. 1688. Website visitors can rotate and zoom in on the globes in the collection.

High-resolution press images from the Kraus map collection are available.

 

 
 

Media Contacts for members of the press

Alicia Dietrich
Public Affairs Representative
Phone: 512-232-3667
Cell: 512-636-1216
Fax: 512-471-9646
aliciadietrich@utexas.edu

Jennifer Tisdale
Director of Public Affairs
Phone: 512-471-8949
Cell: 512-921-0845
Fax: 512-471-9646
jentisdale@utexas.edu

Harry Ransom Center
The University of Texas at Austin
P.O. Box 7219
Austin TX 78713-7219

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