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Media Advisory — October 3, 2017

"Classical Mexican Cinema Series"
Complements "Mexico Modern" Exhibition

Film still

"María Candelaria" (1943)

What: The Harry Ransom Center and Austin Film Society (AFS) present the "Classical Mexican Cinema Series" in conjunction with the Ransom Center's current exhibition "Mexico Modern: Art, Commerce and Cultural Exchange, 1920-1945."

When: Various dates in October and November.

Where: AFS Cinema at 6406 N I-35 Suite 3100 for screenings in October and the Harry Ransom Center at The University of Texas at Austin, 21st and Guadalupe Streets, for November screenings.

Background: "Classical Mexican Cinema Series" is held in conjunction with the Ransom Center's exhibition "Mexico Modern: Art, Commerce and Cultural Exchange, 1920-1945."

Tickets are required for screenings at AFS Cinema at 6406 N I-35 Suite 3100 and are $11.25 for the general public, with discounted pricing for AFS and Ransom Center members. Screenings at the Ransom Center are free. For screenings at the Ransom Center, line forms upon arrival of the first person, and doors open 30 minutes in advance.

Images: High-resolution press images are available.


"El Compadre Mendoza" (1934)
Sunday, Oct. 8, 6:30 p.m.

Initially a movement to overthrow the dictator Porfirio Díaz, by 1913 the Mexican Revolution had devolved into a factional civil war, with various leaders vying for power. During this chaotic period, Rosalío Mendoza (Alfredo del Diestro), a wily, well-to-do rancher, thrives by opportunistically supporting whichever faction appears at his hacienda's doorstep. When troops loyal to Emiliano Zapata arrive, Mendoza befriends their general, Felipe Nieto (Antonio R. Frausto). They become so close that the Mendozas name their first child after Nieto, and he becomes the boy's godfather. But what will Mendoza do when a rival faction offers him a huge sum of money to betray Nieto? In a national survey of film critics and historians in 1994, "El Compadre Mendoza" was voted the third best Mexican film ever made. Directed by Juan Bustillo. Spanish with English subtitles, 1h 25 minutes. Charles Ramírez Berg, Professor in Media Studies at The University of Texas at Austin and author of "The Classical Mexican Cinema," will introduce. Event details.


"¡Vámonos con Pancho Villa!" (1936)
Sunday, Oct. 15, 6:30 p.m.

In 1914, six friends, all rancheros who have sat out the Revolution, decide to do the honorable thing and join the rebel army of General Pancho Villa (Domingo Soler). As the months go by, however, their idealistic fervor is ground down: first by tedium, then by the savagery of combat. After two die in battle and a third is killed by friendly fire, the survivors' patriotic zeal is slowly erased by the war's brutality. A humane and increasingly sorrowful look at the perversion of the Revolution's best intentions, "¡Vámonos con Pancho Villa!" was voted the best Mexican film of all time in 1994. Directed by Fernanda de Fuentes. Spanish with English subtitles, 1h 32 minutes. Charles Ramírez Berg, Professor in Media Studies at The University of Texas at Austin and author of "The Classical Mexican Cinema," will introduce. Event details.


"Distinto Amanecer" (1943)
Thursday, Nov. 2, 7 p.m.

In "Distinto Amanecer," an exemplar of the cabaretera genre, Andrea Palma stars as Julieta, the disaffected wife of a civil servant (Alberto Galán), who helps a former friend (Pedro Armendáriz) as he tries to elude would-be assassins. Directed by Julio Bracho; cinematography by Gabriel Figueroa. Spanish with English subtitles, 108 minutes. Charles Ramírez Berg, Professor in Media Studies at The University of Texas at Austin and author of "The Classical Mexican Cinema," will introduce.


"María Candelaria" (1943)
Thursday, Nov. 9, 7 p.m.

Dolores del Rio and Pedro Armendáriz star in the drama "María Candelaria," a story of prejudice and romantic tragedy on the eve of the Mexican Revolution. "María Candelaria" won both the Grand Prix and Best Cinematography at the Cannes Film Festival in 1946. Directed by Emilio Fernández; cinematography by Gabriel Figueroa. Spanish with English subtitles, 102 minutes. Charles Ramírez Berg, Professor in Media Studies at The University of Texas at Austin and author of "The Classical Mexican Cinema," will introduce.


"Enamorada" (1946)
Thursday, Nov. 16, 7 p.m.

Set during the Mexican Revolution, an aristocratic young woman (María Félix) falls in love with a rebel general (Pedro Armendáriz) in "Enamorada." Directed by Emilio Fernández; cinematography by Gabriel Figueroa. Spanish with English subtitles, 99 minutes. Charles Ramírez Berg, Professor in Media Studies at The University of Texas at Austin and author of "The Classical Mexican Cinema," will introduce.

 

 
 

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Jennifer Tisdale
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Phone: 512-471-8949
Cell: 512-921-0845
Fax: 512-471-9646
jentisdale@utexas.edu

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Phone: 512-471-6406
Cell: 512-348-4055
Fax: 512-471-9646
skrause@utexas.edu

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