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Hall-Troubridge Teaching Guides

These guides have been developed to provide resources to instructors interested in teaching with the Hall-Troubridge Digital Collection and to offer students the opportunity to engage with archival resources to enrich their learning experience.


Takedown Notice: This material is made available for education and research purposes. The Harry Ransom Center does not own the rights for these items; it cannot grant or deny permission to use this material. Copyright law protects unpublished as well as published materials. Rights holders for these materials may be listed in the WATCH file. It is your responsibility to determine the rights status and secure whatever permission may be needed for the use of any item. Due to the nature of archival collections, rights information may be incomplete or out of date. We welcome updates or corrections. Upon request, we'll remove material from public view while we address a rights issue. The unpublished works, correspondence, diaries, and daybooks of Una Vincenzo, Lady Troubridge are under copyright in the United States. The Ransom Center is grateful to Alessandro Rossi Lemeni Makedon, the representative of Troubridge's estate, who has granted permission for the Center to share the papers of Troubridge.

Educational Resources Classroom Experiences

Produced with support from a Digitizing Hidden Collections grant awarded by the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) funded by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

These teaching guides were written by Coyote Shook.

This work would not have been possible without generous contributions of time and thoughtful feedback from the following people: Dr. Michelle Scott (Department of History, University of Maryland, Baltimore County), Dr. Lisa Moore (Department of English, University of Texas at Austin), Dr. Jana Funke (Department of English, University of Exeter), and Dr. KJ Rawson (Departments of English and Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, Northeastern University).

This work also owes a significant debt of gratitude to all those who participated in professional developments related to the teaching guide, including graduate students from the Departments of Communication, English, African and African Diaspora Studies, and American Studies at the University of Texas at Austin and Dr. Julia Haug and her students in the University of Texas College of Education.